News + Stories

Uncategorized / 26.08.2016

Author: Rachael Eplee   As the Osa Conservation Wildcat program has shown us time and time again, cameras are an extension of our eyes into the forest.  They sit there quietly, waiting to witness what wildlife happens to unfold before them.  Our cameras on the ground have allowed us to track animal populations throughout the Osa Peninsula, giving us new perspective on the tendencies and patterns of the animals with whom we share a home. But are we missing something?  Look up!  As anyone who has been to a tropical rainforest knows,...

Uncategorized / 19.08.2016

Photo Credit: Crisbellt Alvarado The Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) recently held a major international, intercultural planning meeting last week in the Osa Peninsula. Attendees gathered from offices in Colombia and Suriname and also the ACT Headquarters in Arlington. Tribal representatives from six different partner communities also traveled from far and wide to participate. The meeting was the brainchild of Liliana Madrigal, Vice-President and Co-Founder of ACT, who also serves as Osa Conservation’s Board President. A native Costa Rican, Liliana helped found the Nature Conservancy’s International Program and Conservation International. She was...

Uncategorized / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- La acuicultura  es también conocida  como criaderos de peces y mariscos  --  se refiere a la reproducción, cría y recolección de plantas y animales en todo tipo de ambientes acuáticos, como estanques, ríos, lagos y el océano. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Aunque la comunidad global está apenas empezando a valorar la acuacultura como una potencial solución al dilema que presenta el mermamiento de los océanos, lo cierto es que no se trata de una nueva práctica.  De hecho, a pesar de que los historiadores dicen que la cuna de la acuicultura...

Aquatic Health, Marine Conservation / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez The world’s seafood stocks will have completely collapsed by the year 2050, scientists say.  According to a study done by a group of economists and ecologists, the growth of the human population combined with unsustainable fishing practices and the devastating loss of biodiversity will lead to the collapse of fish populations in the next 35 years, if trends continue on their current path. [caption id="attachment_9221" align="alignleft" width="199"] Image from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/[/caption] If the idea of losing all of the world’s fish scares you as much as it scares me,...

Uncategorized / 05.08.2016

Once, the idea that animals would go extinct was unthinkable; it was believed that the world’s resources were so vast that they could never be extinguished.   Yet, the dwindling numbers of so many well-known species such as the ferocious Tiger tell a different story.  Extinction is a natural phenomenon and should occur at about 5 species per year.  However, human intervention, climate change, and other factors, that rate is much accelerated and has been estimated by the Center for Biological Diversity to be 1,000 to 10,000 times the...