September 2016 - Osa Conservation
-1
archive,date,bridge-core-1.0.5,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-18.1,qode-theme-bridge,disabled_footer_top,qode_header_in_grid,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-6.0.2,vc_responsive

News + Stories

Uncategorized / 23.09.2016

What is breadfruit? As its name suggests, breadfruit is a fruit that has the same texture as baked bread and it has what many call a potato-like flavor. Part of the Mulberry Tree family that originated in the South Pacific region, almost 300 years ago, this overlooked flowering tree has recently become a hot topic in discussing hunger, poverty and nutrition. With multiple health benefits and the nutritional value this fruit provides, breadfruit could be the next super food and staple. History of Breadfruit Originally from present-day New Guinea, breadfruit has...

Uncategorized / 16.09.2016

Cats of the Osa Osa Conservation has recently been featured in a New York Times article that highlights our Wildlife Monitoring Program. Our extensive monitoring program captures images of wildlife and their prey in order to research their abundance within Corcovado National Park, Osa Conservation properties and other private landowners and partners in collaboration with the National University of Costa Rica (UNA). These images tell a story; they helped bring to light that the estimated fifty jaguars (a 2005 estimation) that were found in the Osa Peninsula has dwindled down to between an...

Community Outreach, Uncategorized / 09.09.2016

What are Ecosystem Services? The concept of ecosystem services was developed in order to express the value that nature has to people and the benefits we derive from it. Types of Ecosystem Services There are three types of ecosystem services:  direct services, indirect services, and cultural/aesthetic services. Direct services are the resources that we directly benefit from extracting from nature.  Drinking water, timber, natural gas and oils, plants such as cotton, and numerous other plants for medicinal benefits.  We depend on these resources so heavily that it is unfathomable to think that...

Uncategorized / 02.09.2016

Author/Photos: Janelle Cannon Woke early one morning to join in on a sea turtle nest census. As our group walked the beach, I saw dozens of freshly dug crab burrows. These fast-moving crabs are digging machines! Manuel, who works at Osa Conservation, has been monitoring sea turtle nests for 14 years. The first nest we came upon had been pillaged by coatimundis. It was a thorough job. Only one intact egg remained. Most nests contain 100-150 eggs, so these are treasure chests of delicious protein for any hungry predator. Humans used to be the primary predator,...