News + Stories

Uncategorized / 21.02.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11002" align="aligncenter" width="480"] Sydney's favorite stingless bee nest.[/caption] Studying bees can be tedious work, but not because of needing to carefully avoid the stingers. The bees I've been observing (thankfully) lack them, making it easy to get up close and personal with my little buzzing friends. Rather than getting stung, this work is difficult because the nests are very challenging to find. I've learned that field biology is not just recording data vast quantities of data all day. First, the subject must be...

Uncategorized / 14.02.2018

Manuel Sánchez es el coordinador del programa de tortugas marinas y un asistente de investigación para Conservación Osa. Las primeras lluvias. Luego de seis largos meses de una época seca, por fin llegaron las lluvias fuertes y volverán a despertar el bosque, y con ellos los que por este tiempo fueron escondidos. Empiezan las primeras ranas de vidrio a cantar en los riachuelos y ríos, el nivel del agua crece y tenemos las primeras crecidas de ellos. En canto la temporada de lluvia avanza muchos lugares y especie de anfibios...

Uncategorized / 14.02.2018

Blogpost written by Manuel Sánchez, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator and Wildlife Photographer The first rains. After six long months of the dry season, strong downpours have returned at last to wake the forest once more, and with them return the creatures that hid away from the rainless weather. The first glass frogs (Neobatrachia centrolenidae) begin to sing in the creeks and rivers, the water level gradually rising with the first floods of the year. The rainy season advances across in a roaring song, and various amphibian species begin to search...

Uncategorized / 06.02.2018

Blogpost written by Eli Boreth,  9 years old Conservation Volunteer This Butterfly Isn't Blue [caption id="attachment_10941" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Credit: Active Wild[/caption]   This is a Blue Morpho Butterfly. This butterfly lives in tropical and neotropical (which are slightly drier) rainforests in Mexico and Central America, and throughout South America. Although this butterfly looks blue, it has no blue pigment. It appears blue because of how its wing scales are structured. The wing scales are made up of cells that are shaped like Christmas trees. When light bounces off the “branches” of these...

Uncategorized / 02.02.2018

Blogpost por Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnica El 2 de febrero de cada año se celebra el  Día Mundial de los Humedales,  fecha en que se adoptó la Convención sobre los Humedales. Se denomina humedal a todas aquellas áreas que permanecen inundadas o por lo menos, con suelos saturados de agua durante amplios periodos de tiempo; de manera que el agua define su estructura y funciones ecológicas. Los humedales son vitales para la supervivencia humana; son de los ecosistemas más productivos del planeta y albergan una diversidad biológica y...

Uncategorized / 02.02.2018

Blogpost written by Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnica   World Wetlands Day is celebrated on February 2 of each year, the date on which the Convention on Wetlands was adopted. Wetland is all those areas that remain flooded or at least, with soils saturated with water for long periods of time – thus, water defines its structure and ecological functions. Wetlands are vital for human survival. As one of the most productive ecosystems on the planet, they harbor a biological diversity and water sources on which countless species of plants...