March 2018 - Osa Conservation
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News + Stories

Uncategorized / 28.03.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11180" align="aligncenter" width="632"] Underneath Osa's Canopy. Photo by Manuel Sánchez[/caption] As a Conservation Volunteer at Osa Conservation, I get the best of every world. I am taking a year off after graduating high school to explore my many interests in an attempt to better understand some of the subjects I am considering studying in college, one of which is biology. What better place to fully experience the life of a field biologist than at a research station in one of the most biologically intense...

Uncategorized / 20.03.2018

Blogpost por Juan Carlos Cruz, Feline Program Coordinator Era una mañana caliente pero húmeda, como es usual en ésta área durante la temporada seca. Es difícil mantener el paso mientras caminamos en un  sendero a través del bosque. El terreno es empinado y la humedad mezclada con el vapor caliente que emana el suelo nos hace sudar como si estuviéramos corriendo un maratón. Es la última parte de subidas y finalmente llegamos a la cadena de montañas que atraviesa al Parque Nacional Piedras Blancas. Estamos ahora en la cima...

Uncategorized / 20.03.2018

Blog written by Juan Carlos Crus Diaz, Feline Program Coordinator I can clearly remember:  It was a hot but humid morning, which is common in this area during the dry season. As we walk through the rainforest, we struggle to keep our pace on the trail - it is steep and the humidity make us feel like we are running a marathon. We come to the last hill and finally reach the ridge of the mountain chain that goes through Piedras Blancas National Park. We summit the top and...

Uncategorized / 14.03.2018

Blogpost written by Marvin López, Botanical Specialist [caption id="attachment_11074" align="aligncenter" width="4608"] Flowers of Aristolochia goudotii, a plant commonly called pipevine, in its natural habitat. It is a woody, evergreen, twining vine of the birthwort family that produces unusual apetulous flowers, each of which features a calyx resembling a dutchman’s pipe.[/caption] I have lived most of my life here, in the Osa Peninsula, one of the places with the most extensive forest cover of my country, Costa Rica. It holds a vast diversity of plant species, some of which are still unknown to...

Uncategorized / 07.03.2018

Post by Philip Przybyszewski, DC Office Intern. [caption id="attachment_11117" align="aligncenter" width="6000"] A view of the far-reaching canopy and the Pacific Ocean from up above.[/caption] No, this isn’t just an issue for raving environmentalists. This is a big deal for everyone. Even though they only cover 2% of the Earth’s surface, they are of utmost importance to all species, particularly humans. Tropical rainforests are the wettest, most vegetation-intense biomes in the world, so densely-grown that a canopy is formed that weaves together the ecosystem into a far-spanning green landscape. Incredibly, this ecosystem...