May 2019 - Osa Conservation
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News + Stories

Science and Research / 22.05.2019

Blogpost by Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Botanical projects coordinator You have likely heard about the growing list of wildlife that is vulnerable, threatened or critically threatened. While it is true that we are losing biodiversity among wildlife, such as amphibians and insects, faster than we can categorize them, there is a parallel story unfolding among plants, particularly trees. There are an estimated 60,000 tree species, that we know of, around the world. And based on work being done by the Global Tree Campaign and IUCN Red list, approximately 8,000 of those—over...

Uncategorized / 15.05.2019

Blogpost por Jonathan Navarro Picado, Coordinador del Programa de Ríos Saludables Los niños nos enseñan cosas nuevas cada día y están llenos de sorpresas, lo único que ocupan es una motivación. La comunidad de Alto Laguna en Osa, nuestra única reserva indígena en la Península, está llena de bosque, vida, atardeceres impresionantes y personas inspiradoras. Los estudiantes de la escuela en la comunidad, recibieron una charla sobre la importancia de los ríos, pero más que enseñarles, ellos nos enseñaron por medio del arte la compresión que tienen del tesoro natural y...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 15.05.2019

Blogpost by Jonathan Navarro Picado, Healthy Rivers Program Coordinator Children teach us new things every day and they are full of surprises; the only thing they need is a bit of motivation.  The community of Alto Laguna in Osa, the only indigenous reserve on the Osa Peninsula, is full of forest, life, stunning sunsets and inspiring people. The students of the school in the community received a talk about the importance of the rivers. But more than teaching them, they taught us through art the understanding they have of this...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 04.05.2019

By Irene Artiñano Banegas, Student in the first annual Costa Rican Restoration & Rewilding Field Course Restoration & Rewilding Field Course participants travelled across the Osa Peninsula to learn about conservation threats and initiatives in the region. Here, Irene, Osa Conservation staff, other course participants visit the Terraba-Sierpe Wetland. Photo: Michelle Monge I learned a lot during my two months in the Restoration & Rewilding Field Course at Osa Conservation. Our adventures included installing camera traps to monitor the activity of different mammals, walking through the forest learning (and hearing...