News + Stories

Uncategorized / 15.05.2019

Blogpost por Jonathan Navarro Picado, Coordinador del Programa de Ríos Saludables Los niños nos enseñan cosas nuevas cada día y están llenos de sorpresas, lo único que ocupan es una motivación. La comunidad de Alto Laguna en Osa, nuestra única reserva indígena en la Península, está llena de bosque, vida, atardeceres impresionantes y personas inspiradoras. Los estudiantes de la escuela en la comunidad, recibieron una charla sobre la importancia de los ríos, pero más que enseñarles, ellos nos enseñaron por medio del arte la compresión que tienen del tesoro natural y...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2019

Blogpost by Marco Hidalgo-Chaverri, Coordinador del Programa de Resiliencia del Ecosistema y Alcance Comunitario   La Ciencia Ciudadana (o Citizen Science), es donde vemos la participación del público en general en actividades de investigación científica en las que los ciudadanos contribuyen activamente, ya sea con su esfuerzo intelectual o con el conocimiento local de su entorno o aportando su propia experiencia cotidiana. Esta forma diferente de hacer ciencia contribuye al conocimiento científico a través de la participación de ciudadanos voluntarios y capacitados que generalmente no son especialistas en el tema a investigar...

Uncategorized / 26.02.2019

Blog post by Hilary Brumberg, Healthy Rivers Program Coordinator Osa Conservation was recently awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve the research facilities, communication and equipment at our Osa Verde Biological Station (Piro), which will position this field station to become a leading center for tropical research, education and conservation. With this new infrastructure, we will increase our capacity to host interdisciplinary researchers, academic groups, and citizen science trainings, therefore advancing scientific knowledge about tropical ecology and enhancing scientific literacy.  Location of new NSF-funded laboratory at Osa...

Uncategorized / 13.02.2019

Blogpost by Mariam Weyand, Sea Turtle Biologist Osa Conservation relies on the help and support of volunteers to maximize our conservation impact, like many non-profits. Fortunately, we have diverse people coming to discover, help and get involved in our programs. We can separate them into two important groups: short term participants, such as students, families and tourists, and long-term volunteers. In 2018, we had the luck that many individuals came and helped us with field work in the Sea Turtle Program. They all came to discover the great experience and hard work...

Uncategorized / 17.01.2019

Blog por Marco Hidalgo, coordinador del programa de resiliencia del ecosistema y alcance comunitario La cacería de animales silvestres, en el caso de la Península de Osa, tiene claras características para ser considerada como un elemento cultural de las personas que la practican. Estas características se cumplen mayormente con quienes practican el monteo y con quienes cazan exclusivamente para consumir la carne. La gran mayoría de estos casos ya no se considera una práctica, sino una costumbre o tradición. Pero esta valoración de elemento cultural no es válido para...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Uncategorized / 05.12.2018

Blogpost by Alice Connell, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant [caption id="attachment_12037" align="aligncenter" width="421"] Alice monitoring the effectiveness of log piles in attracting amphibian and reptile species to the restoration and rewilding plots. Photo: Sophie Blow[/caption] My work is never the same from one day to the next on the Restoration and Rewilding Program, which encompasses many diverse projects that require frequent monitoring. There is plenty to do, I always arrive at lunch hungry and satisfied after mornings of hard work. I want to give you an insight into my...

Community Outreach, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Sustainable agriculture / 28.11.2018

Blogpost by Charlotte Watteyn, doctoral researcher at KU Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Costa Rica, collaborating with Osa Conservation If you think about vanilla, you immediately start to imagine delicious ice creams, cakes and other yummy sweets. But where does this vanilla come from? Well, it is extracted from the fruits (beans or pods) of orchid vines, producing an intense aroma resulting from a complex of molecules. These orchids belong to the genus Vanilla (Orchidaceae), a diverse group of climbing hemi-epiphytes growing around trees with their aerial roots. The...

Science and Research / 21.11.2018

Blog Post by Brandon André Güell, NSF Pre-doctoral Fellow and Ph.D. Student, Warkentin Lab, Boston University [caption id="attachment_11992" align="aligncenter" width="522"] Brandon Güell observing a breeding aggregation at Shampoo Pond. Photo: Brandon Güell[/caption] It was about 06:00 after night-long heavy rains ended a short dry spell, and already you could hear a deafening chorus of creatures gathering at the pond. Though sleepless and mosquito-ridden, we trudged chest-deep through the murky swamp waters with notebook and camera in hand to reach the source of the chaos. That’s when we saw it: One...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 14.11.2018

Blog Post by Elène Haave Audet, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant   [caption id="attachment_11964" align="aligncenter" width="448"] Elène holding a Noctilio leporinus, the Greater bulldog bat, which fishes from streams. Photo: Doris Audet[/caption] For many of us, the creatures of the tropical forest that dare venture at night remain elusive and mysterious beings, their ways of life foreign to us daytime dwellers. Among these enigmatic animals are bats, the group of mammals with the second largest number of species in the world, whose charismatic presence in the tropics will not go...

Uncategorized / 07.11.2018

Blog Post by Marco Hidalgo, Coordinator for Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse Our tropical forests, including the extensions of mangroves that slope down the south pacific, suffer a constant threat from different man-made factors. One of the most significant threats is the lack of predators and their prey, which have decreased due to recreational and cultural hunting in the Osa Peninsula. In the search for practical solutions on the ecosystem-level, Osa Conservation’s Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse project hopes to increase the resilience of ecosystems in the Osa Peninsula through the use...