Avian Conservation Archives - Osa Conservation
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News + Stories

Birds, Volunteers and Visitors / 08.11.2011

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO SPEND YOUR HOLIDAYS IN THE RAINFOREST! DECEMBER 17-22 Space is still available on our Holiday Birding Trip, so join us for spectacular birding through the tropical forests of the Osa Peninsula! This five-day trip includes extensive birding, forest hikes, and nightly talks and excursions with our staff of biologists and conservation professionals.  The trip culminates in the National Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count—where you, along with thousands of other citizen scientists throughout the Americas, can participate in the longest running wildlife census to assess the...

Uncategorized / 06.06.2011

By Karen Leavelle [caption id="attachment_2143" align="alignleft" width="187" caption="Female Yellow-billed Cotinga on the day of her tagging Feb. 15, 2011"][/caption] It really is like no other bird that I have seen. These birds are truly beautiful with movements and behavioral characteristics unique to its species.   These big black eyes belong to a male Yellow-billed Cotinga (Carpodectes antoniae), a highly endangered Costa Rican resident bird species.  It is also know locally as the Cotinga Piquiamarillo. He is just one of a dwindling number remaining here in the southern pacific coastal slope of Costa...

Birds / 26.11.2010

[caption id="attachment_1840" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Male White-crested Coquette"][/caption] Of all the hummingbird species, the coquette males that are most highly adorned with ornate feathers that are there to likely help in territorial defense and enhance species recognition.  The White-crested Coquette (Lophornis adorabilis) is the only coquette found here on the Osa Peninsula and is regionally endemic to south western Costa Rica and Western Panama. The male of this species, which is also sometimes called Adorable Coquette, is known for its white crest and long green cheek tufts and may be arguably...

Birds / 17.10.2010

[caption id="attachment_1702" align="alignleft" width="197" caption="Male Turquoise Cotinga. Photo by Ulises Quintero"][/caption] This week as promised I am bringing you the Turquoise Cotinga (Cotinga ridgwayi).  This is definitely one of those species of bird that makes you go "WOW" when you see it.  This is also one of Costa Rica's most sensitive species to loss of forest habitat.  BirdLife International has this Cotinga species listed as Vulnerable which puts it one step away from be considered Endangered.  It is a regional endemic only found on the Pacific slope of...

Birds / 10.10.2010

[caption id="attachment_1640" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Riverside Wren Nest. Photo by Jim Tamarack and Cheryl Chip"][/caption] A few weeks ago I posted a birder’s challenge question where I asked you to tell me how the Riverside Wren (Thryothorus semibadius) was positioned in its nest (go to the archived story here).  Here is the recap and your responses. Since Riverside Wrens are known at times for roosting inside their nests during all seasons of the year with sometimes two or three individuals at a time we wondered about this particular wren when...

Birds / 03.10.2010

Have you ever sat and marveled at the wonder of bird migration; the journey that birds undertake between their winter and summer homes?  Well if so, you’re not alone, and it is a cause for celebration!  Each year hundreds of thousands of people gather to celebrate International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) in support of migratory bird conservation. You may be asking yourself, why a post on a day normally held in May.  Aha, that all depends on where you are in the hemisphere.  Because there is more than one...

Birds / 26.09.2010

[caption id="attachment_1483" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Pale-billed Woodpecker Male. Photograph by Alan Dahl"][/caption] Of the eight woodpecker species that are found on the Osa Peninsula, the Pale-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus guatemalensis) is the largest with a length of 35 cm (14 inches) rivaling only the superficially similar, and range overlapping Lineated Woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus).  In fact, the Pale-billed Woodpecker is most closely related to the extremely elusive north temperate species the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, both belonging to the same genus, Campephilus.  This species ranges from southern Mexico to Western Panama. The Pale-billed is...

Birds / 19.09.2010

[caption id="attachment_1416" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Chestnut-backed Antbird. Photo by Alan Dahl "][/caption] Chestnut-backed Antbirds (Myrmeciza exsul) are common residents of the Osa Peninsula and one of the most abundant species found here.  It is difficult to walk outside here at Friends of the Osa's Osa Biodiversity Center and not hear two or three individuals counter-singing.  Often times when the rest of the forest has become fairly quiet you can always count on a Chestnut-backed Antbird to let you know that all is as it should be. The signature look of three...

Birds / 13.09.2010

[caption id="attachment_1341" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Riverside Wren nest by Cheryl Chip & Jim Tamarack"][/caption] For those of you who may remember, I posted a feature on the Riverside Wren (Thryothorus semibadius) back in April.  It was one of my first postings for the then new Friends of the Osa's blog The Osa Chronicles and a few of you commented on both the nature history and photography by Gianfranco Gomez. One of the species ecological behaviors I wrote about was of reproduction and nesting.  When I spoke about the nest of...

Birds, Community Outreach / 30.08.2010

[caption id="attachment_1220" align="alignleft" width="300"] Karen Leavelle presenting the Yellow-billed Cotinga spatial distribution project[/caption] The Costa Rican Ornithological Union’s second annual conference was held July 28 – 30th 2010 in the school of biology at the University of Costa Rica in the capital of San Jose.  The conference was dedicated to Daniel Janzen and his pioneering work in the field of conservation and reforestation in Costa Rica over the last several decades.  Attendees present represented national and international organizations working hard at avian science and conservation throughout the country coming...