News + Stories

Uncategorized / 25.07.2017

Blogpost written by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Hello fellow nature enthusiasts! My name is Hilary Brumberg, and I am the new coordinator of the Ríos Saludables (Healthy Rivers) program. I just graduated from Wesleyan University in Connecticut a few weeks ago with a degree in environmental science and Spanish, and I am a Princeton in Latin America fellow. My day-to-day activities here in the Osa Peninsula are very different from those in urban Connecticut. Each morning, I crawl out of my bug net and emerge among the mango trees on...

Volunteers and Visitors / 19.07.2017

Blogpost written by Sawyer Judge, Volunteer Before going to the Osa for the first time, I was looking forward to seeing rare big cats, incredible crawling insects and of course the famous scarlet Macaw's that thrive in the region. But the Osa was so much more than I could have ever expected and it amazed me from the moment I got here! [caption id="attachment_10222" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Photo by CIFOR on Flickr[/caption] The taxi ride to Osa Conservation's biological station is bumpy, but with taxi-driver Andi (a man from Germany who has lived...

Birds / 11.07.2017

Blogpost written by Patrick Newcombe, Conservation Visitor  When I first arrived in the Osa for my birding experience, the tremendous diversity of birds astounded me. I seemed to spot a new species each time I walk into the forest around Osa Conservation's biological station.  Even at the station itself, I saw such birds as the Fiery-billed Aracari, an endemic species in both Panama and Costa Rica. The species diversity stems, in large part, from the selective pressure insectivorous birds put on their prey. This causes insects to adapt in order...

Uncategorized / 07.07.2017

Blogpost by Sawyer Judge "Was your coral scouting successful?" I hear a lovely British accent come calling from the stairs. Two dogs come bounding down the stairs to the beach as Harvey is helping us out of the boat. The owner of the accent, Susan, makes her way towards us. "How was the boat ride, loves? Come refresh with some juice in the kitchen. It's cas juice! Fresh made!" There are six of us visiting the Saladero EcoLodge that Harvey and Susan call home. Harvey and Susan are long-time partners of Osa Conservation, and they're housing us...

Marine Conservation, Sea Turtles / 05.07.2017

Blogpost written by Marina Garrido, Sea Turtle Volunteer As a sea turtle volunteer, I have spent the last few weeks here in the Osa constructing the turtle hatchery for the upcoming nesting season. Each year, the hatchery is moved to a new location along the beach in order to relocate nests in an area with "clean" sand which was not used in the previous nesting season.  The process is long and tough and requires many hours and many hands, but the end product is so rewarding that the work...