News + Stories

Uncategorized / 29.11.2017

Blogpost by Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnica Each year from the middle of December through early January, Christmas bird counts are organized worldwide. These counts consist of the identification and registration of the number of bird species observed in a given period of time. This tradition has been established in the world of bird watchers and is taught to each new generation. The Osa Peninsula is no exception to this tradition, as different organizations collaborate in December for one day to participate in tracking the progress of endangered species and...

Uncategorized / 29.11.2017

Blogpost by Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnico  Cada año a mediados del mes de diciembre y principios de enero  se organizan a nivel mundial conteos navideños de aves los cuales consisten en la identificación y registro del número de especies de aves observadas en un lapso de tiempo  determinado; es así como se establece una tradición en el mundo de los observadores de aves la cual es transmitida de generación en generación. La Península de Osa no es la excepción, donde organizaciones de toda índole en el mes de diciembre colaboran...

Uncategorized / 21.11.2017

Blog by Danielle Connor, Undergraduate Student at University of Exeter Earlier this year, I spent many hours following the endangered spider monkey in the Osa. As part of a new project being carried out by Osa Conservation and my own research with the University of Exeter, I looked for sleeping sites and latrines to better understand the ecological role of spider monkeys in seed dispersal and their potential to regenerate rainforests. [caption id="attachment_10440" align="aligncenter" width="422"] A spider monkey hangs from a tree[/caption]   Spider monkeys live in fission-fusion societies that split into smaller...

Uncategorized / 15.11.2017

Blogpost by Manuel Sanchez, Sea Turtle Conservation Program Coordinator   Nature is not always kind; sea turtles face a multitude of life threatening obstacles that reduce their chance of survival throughout their lives. Predation of eggs, hatchlings and adults by numerous predators is just one of the risks. Raccoons, coatis, opossums, crabs, dogs, birds and ants attack nests to indulge in an egg or a young sea turtle. Once the hatchling emerges from the nest, the challenge continues as hawks, pelicans, frigate birds, crabs and fish await a bite-size meal....

Aquatic Health, Community Outreach, Uncategorized / 07.11.2017

Blogpost by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Students in bright blue uniforms dip nets into a small stream and retrieve soggy masses of leaves, branches, rocks, and candy wrappers. They comb through the leaves with plastic spoons, and excitedly pluck small insects and crustaceans from the foliage and place them into the stream water filled ice cube tray  - our fancy specimen holder. The students rush the specimens over to our identification station, a tree stump bearing a laminated booklet with dozens of pictures of aquatic critters. They methodically scan each...