News + Stories

Uncategorized / 26.09.2018

Blog Post By Marina Garrido, Restoration & Rewilding Program Assistant As one of the assistants of the Restoration & Rewilding Program, I am happy to announce a new project entitled “Creating the First Conservation Action Plan for the Endemic and Endangered Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog using Citizen Science and Tiny-Tech.” [caption id="attachment_11740" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Phyllobates vittatus posing perfectly for Robin Moore´s camera lens at Osa Conservation's Biological Station. Photo taken from the book In Search of Lost Frogs by Robin Moore.[/caption] Many of you might be wondering, what makes...

Uncategorized / 17.09.2018

Blog Post by Avery Kaplan, Rios Saludables Intern One sunny day this summer, the Ríos Saludables team was wading through the rivers Agujas, La Palma, Montarey, and Sabalo, collecting shrimp traps number 122 through number 132. It was the third time in three months that we had set and collected traps all along these rivers, and we were back the second time that week to check on the traps that we had set the day before. In other words, sometimes even the best field work gets repetitive. [caption id="attachment_11848" align="aligncenter"...

Uncategorized / 12.09.2018

Blog Post by Dr. Mark Laidre, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College Few things are more fascinating to layperson and scientist alike than animal behavior. For some, this simple fascination can ultimately fuel a lifelong passion for discovering why animals do what they do. Perhaps no better example is the Nobel Prize-winning biologist Karl von Frisch, who, as one of the founding fathers of animal behavior, spent decades studying the social behavior of bees. It may at first seem puzzling how someone could devote such prolonged study...

Uncategorized / 05.09.2018

Blog Post by Hector Zumbado-Ulate, Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship Awardee My name is Hector Zumbado-Ulate and I’m one of the awardees of Osa Conservation's Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship. Currently, I am pursuing a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology at Purdue University. Since I started my studies in biology, I felt very attached to amphibian conservation projects, especially those helping species which are currently endangered by anthropogenic causes. For that reason, I wanted to work with the critically endangered Golfito robber frog. Specifically, I want to examine why this species persists...