“Restoring forests for bats” and beyond: NASBR 2018 - Osa Conservation
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“Restoring forests for bats” and beyond: NASBR 2018

Blogpost by Elene Haave Audet, Restoration & Rewilding Research Field Assistant

This October, I ventured out of the sanctity of the jungle to present at the 48thNorth American Symposium on Bat Research (NASBR) in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Over 300 researchers from across the globe gathered to share bat stories, communicate their research, and further our understanding of this hugely diverse mammalian group. Because of its location, the conference offered many opportunities to discuss the conservation of bats in the tropics, presenting a great opportunity to share Osa Conservation’s work on surveying bats in the restoration plots.

The Osa Bat Family, Priscila Chaverri, Gloriana Chaverri, Beatriz Lopez, Elene Haave Audet and Doris Audet, at NASBR. Photo: Elene Haave Audet

It was very exciting to see our Restoration and Rewilding efforts so well received by a bat-savvy audience. Researchers were curious to hear about the ways in which Osa Conservation is “restoring forests for bats”. This project is focussed on attracting bats to areas that are actively being restored, for example by planting flowering trees like the balsa, and installing two-meter-tall bat boxes, all with the aim of restoring bat diversity whilst the forest is regenerating.

Micronycteris microstis bats are feeling at home in this bat box, installed by Dr. Chaverri’s team at Osa Conservation. Photo: Elene Haave Audet

Excitingly, the bats of the Osa Peninsula were able to reach the audience in Puerto Vallarta beyond the scope of the restoration project, by researchers conducting work at and around the Osa Verde BioStation. Beatriz Lopez, from the University of Florida, discussed gathering bat echolocation calls on the Osa Peninsula to document species diversity, and Dr. Doris Audet from the University of Alberta, shared her research on bat exploratory behavior in the field. The conference was also a wonderful opportunity to discuss advances in bat research in Costa Rica with Dr. Gloriana Chaverri from the University of Costa Rica, who has planted deep roots of bat research on the peninsula over the course of her career. 

The presence of bat research on the Osa Peninsula, and Osa Conservation’s important contributions to supporting that research, was very well represented at NASBR 2018. The Osa Verde Biostation is truly a gem for bat diversity, with over 50 recorded species of bats to date, and sharing Osa Conservation’s involvement in conserving and restoring habitats for bats ensures that those contributions are recognized and appreciated by the bat community at large. 

Elene, identifying a bat by measuring its forearm, as part of the diversity surveys in the restoration plots. Photo: Elene Haave Audet
Osa Conservation
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