Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Sustainable agriculture

New plant record for the Osa Peninsula: Cipura campanulata

By Marvin Lopez Morales, Botanic Assistant

Not long ago, the Costa Rican ethnobotanist Jorge Luis Poveda visited Osa Conservation. For me, it was an honor and pleasure to meet him. 

Luis Poveda in the forest during his visit to our Conservation campus. Photo credit: Osa Conservation

A simple and very friendly person, he has so many stories to tell about his personal experiences, plants, and teaching a wide variety of people. Poveda has devoted many years of his professional career to projects against cancer, Costa Rican Trees, and Manual of Plants of Costa Rica, among others. In addition, he is a passionate naturalist, and he writes poems inspired by nature itself. 

In one of his walks through Cerro Osa, he saw a small plant that caught his attention that he had not seen before in the Osa Peninsula, Cipura campanulata. It was the first report of this species for the area. Our botanist friend, Reinaldo Aguilar, who lives in Puerto Jiménez, confirmed the discovery.

View of Cerro Osa, natural habitat of this beautiful plant. Photo credit: Osa Conservation

It is a Monocotyledonous plant, belonging to the family of Iridaceae plants. For the country, Costa Rica, there are 6 generaand 14 species registered, among them the genus Cipura, which consists of 5 species in total. 

This plant is found only in the continent of America, with a wide distribution range that extends from Mexico to Colombia and Venezuela and Antilles. In Costa Rica, it is found mainly to the north of the Pacific slope and in the plains of Guanacaste between 0 to 300 meters above sea level. They reach a height of about 20 to 60 cm high, and their leaves have a resemblance to rice plants with white flowers in the shape of a small bell that open very early in the morning and also close in a short time. Because of their small size, they are ideal to have as ornamentals.

Cipura campanulata in its natural environment. This plant has the potential to be used in our gardens as an ornamental plant. Photo credit: Rich Hoyer

This plant flowers once a day. If you get to own one of these wonderful plants, you can be sure every morning that this grass-shaped, bushy plant will have a small flower to brighten the morning, wishing you good morning. Sit with a good coffee and admire the beauty of this fragile and helpless little plant.

One of Poveda’s poems:

La Montaña Mágica

Sí, eres mágica, eres hontanar de sabiduría, eres pan nuestro de cada día.

Oh Montaña Sagrada que nutres nuestras vidas,

joyel de aventuras, sacrosanto vergel,

estancia de mi vejez.

–Jorge Luis Poveda Álvares”

Contact popular website support company to fix WordPress Errors with Geometricbox