April 2019 - Osa Conservation
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News + Stories

Environmental Education, Volunteers and Visitors / 17.04.2019

By Ted May, General Volunteer Many environmentally-aware people, including myself, are attracted to Costa Rica because of the awesome biodiversity there. One has opportunity to explore part of a country that houses 5% of the world’s biodiversity in 51,100 km2– mid-way in size between the U.S. state of West Virginia and the European country of Denmark. Ted May climbing a tree to install an owl box, to create microhabitats to help bird populations. When I arrived as a volunteer at Osa Conservation this March, I was able to explore part of this area,...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2019

Blogpost by Marco Hidalgo-Chaverri, Coordinador del Programa de Resiliencia del Ecosistema y Alcance Comunitario   La Ciencia Ciudadana (o Citizen Science), es donde vemos la participación del público en general en actividades de investigación científica en las que los ciudadanos contribuyen activamente, ya sea con su esfuerzo intelectual o con el conocimiento local de su entorno o aportando su propia experiencia cotidiana. Esta forma diferente de hacer ciencia contribuye al conocimiento científico a través de la participación de ciudadanos voluntarios y capacitados que generalmente no son especialistas en el tema a investigar...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2019

Blogpost by Marco Hidalgo-Chaverri, Coordinator of the Ecosystem Resilience and Community Outreach Program Citizen science is the participation of the general public in scientific research activities. Citizens contribute actively, either through active monitoring or with local knowledge of their environment. This different way of doing science contributes to scientific knowledge through the participation of volunteer and trained citizens who are not usually specialists in the subject to be investigated and who contribute to help solve questions raised in scientific studies. Community Biological Monitoring Group of Rancho Quemado, training with the...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 04.04.2019

Blogpost by Jonathan Navarro Picado, Healthy Rivers Program Coordinator Whether we perceive it or not, the forest is alive; there is movement, there is disorder, and—most importantly—there are endless interactions. This last word is the key to help make this hidden world clear to our human "worlds,” which are so short and tiny in comparison to the existence of these forests. When you walk through the old growth and secondary forests of the Osa Verde BioStation (Piro), you can see everythimg from herbs, seedlings and shrubs to gigantic trees hundreds...