Uncategorized / 18.07.2018

Blog post by Mónica Espinoza Miralles, Marine Conservation Scientist For those passionate about the underwater world it is amazing to see how extraordinarily different the seas are around the world. This was the case for us:  Noelia Hernández, an oceanographer from Spain and Osa Conservation's new Marine Program Coordinator, and myself, Mónica Espinoza, a marine biologist from Costa Rica and Osa Conservation's new Marine Conservation Scientist. We had the opportunity to meet for the first time at Saladero Ecolodge, and from that moment, we realized that we both have...

Uncategorized / 11.07.2018

Blog Post and Photos by Patrick Newcombe Osa Conservation’s landscape is a mosaic of terrestrial habitats including grasslands, palm forests, reforested areas, secondary and primary forests, as well as aquatic habitats such as a ponds, rivers, lagoons and ocean. Elevation ranges from sea level to 1,083 feet (330 meters). This habitat and elevation range result in phenomenal bird diversity and illustrate the importance of the habitat conservation and restoration occurring at Osa Conservation. June 25 was the first Big Day at Osa Conservation! In birding circles, a Big Day is...

Uncategorized / 27.06.2018

Photos and Blog Post by Thomas Meinzen, Restoration and Rewilding Intern and Birder At the Osa Conservation Biological Station, mornings in the rainforest are full of sound—birds, frogs, insects, and monkeys all chirping, singing, buzzing and howling in a unique concert. But not far away, where staff and volunteers are working to restore and rewild deforested pasture lands, the dawn chorus strikes a different tune. Many of the low whistles, creaks, and croaks of the forest are being replaced by new, often higher-pitched sounds. As a researcher and intern...

Uncategorized / 20.06.2018

Blogpost by Manuel Sanchez, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator and Wildlife Photographer There are more than 114 species of bats, and around 80 of these can be found in the Osa Peninsula. Some are so common that they practically live in our houses, while others are so difficult to spot that when you encounter one, you are caught off guard and can't help but think that no animal more incredible exists. It is said that the Osa contains more species of bats than the rest of Costa Rica, and I believe...

Uncategorized / 20.06.2018

Blogpost por Manuel Sanchez, coordinador del programa de tortugas marinas y asistente de investigación. Hay más de 114 especies de murciélagos, y unas 80 especies de ellos están en la Península de Osa. Algunas son tan comunes que viven en nuestras casas, y otras son difícil de mirarles que cuando las encuentras te sorprendas tanto y piensas que no existía un animal tan lindo. Se dice que la Osa tiene la mayor cantidad de especies de murciélagos que en todo Costa Rica, y la verdad lo creo. La Osa tiene los mejores...

Uncategorized / 13.06.2018

Blog Post by Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Feline Program Coordinator When we talk about the jaguar, it is difficult to distinguish the many vital roles this iconic species plays. All throughout Latin America, the jaguar is deeply rooted in the indigenous culture. From a cultural point of view, it has been part of many artistic and cinematic works. From a conservationist point of view, it has been considered everything that a species can be: an umbrella species, a flagship species, a keystone species, an indicator species, and an apex predator. In...

Uncategorized / 13.06.2018

Blogpost por Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Feline Program Coordinator Cuando hablamos de jaguar, es difícil hacer la separación de los muchos contextos en los que esta icónica especie tiene una participación importante. Está fuertemente arraigado en la cosmovisión indígena en todos los países latinoamericanos. Desde el punto de vista cultural, ha estado presente en un sin número de obras artísticas y cinematográficas. Desde el punto de vista de conservación, ha sido considerado todo lo que una especie puede ser: Especie sombrilla, Especie bandera, Especie clave, Especie indicadora y máximo depredador. A...

Uncategorized / 11.05.2018

Blog de Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Coordinadora de los proyectos botánicos Uno de los objetivos de Conservación Osa es apoyar la conservación de árboles amenazados a través del programa de conservación ex situ (la creación de un jardín botánico) que complementa la conservación in situ a través del programa de restauración ecológica y resilvestracion. Sobre el cornizuelo Hace más de un año que sembramos semillas de un árbol Vachellia allenii, localmente llamado cornizuelo (árbol de los cuernos). Este árbol se le encuentra creciendo tanto en los bosques primarios y secundarios y puede alcanzar a...

Uncategorized / 02.05.2018

Blog Post by Lawrence Whittaker, Osa Conservation Field Researcher [caption id="attachment_11274" align="aligncenter" width="513"] A Spider Monkey Observing the Osa Canopy; Photo by Manuel Sanchez[/caption] Elusive Subjects of Study The Osa Peninsula is a stronghold for the Central American spider monkey, an arboreal acrobat adapt to navigating the rainforest canopy. Studying these dynamic mammals can be a challenge, as they don’t give up their secrets easily. To study spider monkeys, one must track them from the moment they wake to the moment they fall asleep. With the closed canopy that blocks out fading daylight from those on the...

Uncategorized / 28.03.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11180" align="aligncenter" width="632"] Underneath Osa's Canopy. Photo by Manuel Sánchez[/caption] As a Conservation Volunteer at Osa Conservation, I get the best of every world. I am taking a year off after graduating high school to explore my many interests in an attempt to better understand some of the subjects I am considering studying in college, one of which is biology. What better place to fully experience the life of a field biologist than at a research station in one of the most biologically intense...