Uncategorized / 14.06.2017

Blogpost written by Lesley Mould, Intern Since vanilla is so popular, it was surprising to learn how challenging it is to grow it in the wild! Vanilla is one of the many rare and distinct plants that can be found in the Osa. The uniqueness of the vanilla plant is fascinating, and its potential to both reforest and spur regional development is heartening in a field that can often be cynical.  As an intern in Osa Conservation’s Washington, D.C. office with a strong interest in botany, I find the...

Uncategorized / 06.06.2017

Blogpost written by Robert Baker, Volunteer Hi, my name is Bob Baker. For the past 10 years, my wife Lindsay and I have come to the Osa Peninsula for two weeks every March. We come to enjoy what National Geographic calls the “most biologically intense place on earth.” We typically stay in vacation rentals in the Cabo Matapalo area which is about 18km south of Puerto Jimenez at the tip of the peninsula. Last March (2016), we arranged to visit Osa Conservation's biological station and during our visit,  Manuel...

Uncategorized / 30.05.2017

Blogpost written by Marina Garrido, Research Field Assistant A few days ago, part of the staff and some researchers went for a walk with Osa Conservation's botanist, Reinaldo Aguilar, from the biological station to the wildlife-friendly farm. All along the way, Reinaldo showed everyone different kinds of plants that grow in the Osa Peninsula, and shared his knowledge about the flora. We all had a lot of fun and enjoyed each plant we saw with all five senses. Since the staff is comprised of both Spanish and English speakers,...

Uncategorized / 24.05.2017

Blogpost written by Eleanor Flatt, Biodiversity Research Field Assistant   In the Osa, “biodiversity” is an  understatement… In the human world, we select people to represent our countries, our towns, our villages, our communities; it is similar in the animal kingdom. A flagship species is an ambassador for a specific habitat and normally conservation of that species or the area they inhabit has benefits for other species. Here in the Osa Peninsula, we are home to a staggering 2.5% of the planets biodiversity, living on a mere 0.00000085% of the earth's...

Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 18.11.2016

A blog by: Cody Stockert Taking the opportunity to study for a block in Costa Rica is the best decision I have made in my four years at Cornell College. [caption id="attachment_9675" align="aligncenter" width="327"] This beach is located on the Osa peninsula of Costa Rica. My classmates and I accessed it using Osa conservation’s trails.[/caption]                         Why did I go to Costa Rica for class? Cornell College is unique because we have a block plan schedule, which means we take one course at...

Uncategorized / 11.11.2016

Written by Jeremy Novak (Cornell University Student) In all honesty The Great Hummingbird War is a tad misleading for three very important reasons: 1) it is really more of a series of fights; 2) it wasn’t that great, more or less as entertaining as the morning news; and 3) the most recent fight had nothing to do with a hummingbird, but rather a moth. The Great Hummingbird War does have one big thing going for it, it sounds a lot more exciting than The Just as Entertaining as the...

Uncategorized / 14.10.2016

This blog and all photos were provided by: Steve Ressel|Professor at College of the Atlantic This past August, I had the good fortune to visit Piro Biological Station for a few days. Piro was one stop on a seven-day scouting trip with another colleague where we explored different areas in the Osa for a future tropical ecology course. My days at Piro BioStation were few in number and mostly filled with logistical considerations associated with bringing students down to the Osa. However, I still left overwhelmed by the amount of...

Uncategorized / 07.10.2016

A blog entry by Vedant Jain (University of California Berkeley) Hi folks or should I say Pura Vida! Here is a little snippet of one of the adventures we had here. On Wednesday morning, after a nice late start we headed to the Piro station where we met with Manuel Sanchez who gave us an introduction to the four species of local sea turtles and the sea turtle conservation efforts on the Osa Peninsula. Turtle conservation is especially important because sea turtle eggs face dangers from factors such as...

Uncategorized / 23.09.2016

What is breadfruit? As its name suggests, breadfruit is a fruit that has the same texture as baked bread and it has what many call a potato-like flavor. Part of the Mulberry Tree family that originated in the South Pacific region, almost 300 years ago, this overlooked flowering tree has recently become a hot topic in discussing hunger, poverty and nutrition. With multiple health benefits and the nutritional value this fruit provides, breadfruit could be the next super food and staple. History of Breadfruit Originally from present-day New Guinea, breadfruit has...

Uncategorized / 16.09.2016

Cats of the Osa Osa Conservation has recently been featured in a New York Times article that highlights our Wildlife Monitoring Program. Our extensive monitoring program captures images of wildlife and their prey in order to research their abundance within Corcovado National Park, Osa Conservation properties and other private landowners and partners in collaboration with the National University of Costa Rica (UNA). These images tell a story; they helped bring to light that the estimated fifty jaguars (a 2005 estimation) that were found in the Osa Peninsula has dwindled down to between an...