Uncategorized / 04.10.2017

Blogpost por Juan Carlos Cruz, Feline Program Coordinator   Una especie que representa a los bosques tropicales de Latinoamérica tanto como un jaguar o un tapir, es sin duda el Chancho de monte, sin embargo no se conoce mucho de ellos. El Chancho de monte o Pecarí de labios blancos se distribuye desde el Sur de México hasta el Norte de Argentina y es la presa principal del Jaguar por excelencia, haciendo que su relación con el máximo depredador del continente sea aún mas interesante. Los chanchos de monte (Tayassu pecari)...

Uncategorized / 07.09.2017

Por Juan Carlos Cruz, Feline Program Coordinator   Conservación Osa se complace de haber trabajado con nuestros compañeros para celebrar el primer taller de la Red de Cámaras Trampa de Osa.     Esta Red agrupa a aquellos interesados en realizar investigación y conservación de felinos – incluyendo comunidades locales, empresas privadas, instituciones de investigación y organizaciones conservacionistas – para ayudar a proveer información para la toma de decisiones y formar una línea base de información de estas especies para las próximas generaciones.   Los felinos son especies clave, las cuales son cruciales para el...

Uncategorized / 29.08.2017

Blogpost written by Dr. Andrew Whitworth, Director of Restoration Ecology & Biodiversity Conservation   Last night, as I prepared my evening feed (rice with something), I heard a strange and unfamiliar squeaking sound from outside. I grabbed my head torch (aka.flashlight) and out I went. This is what I found. [caption id="attachment_10293" align="aligncenter" width="372"] Eyelash pit viper starting its meal (Photo by Andrew Whitworth)[/caption]   I couldn’t believe it. Ever since moving to live on the Osa Peninsula in February, I have been desperate to see the stunning eyelash pit viper (Bothriechis schlegelii),...

Uncategorized / 16.05.2017

Blogpost written by Alejandra Rojas, Naturalist Guide and Avian Program Coordinator        Photo 1:  The endemic & endangered Golfodulcean Poison-arrow Frog  and Black-cheeked Ant Tanager (Photo credit: Manuel Sanchez Mendoza)   What does a Golfodulcean Poison-arrow Frog and a Black-cheeked Ant-tanager have in common? Not only are they endemic to the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, but they are also endangered - a term used to describe when there are so few individuals surviving that the species is at risk of no longer existing in the wild.  There are many reasons that...

Uncategorized / 10.05.2017

Blogpost written by Alejandra Rojas, Naturalist Guide and Avian Program Coordinator Every year, thousands of birds around the world start a long journey that is fundamental to their survival: migration. Each species has its particularity: they fly in flocks or by their own, during the day or the night, they rest or they fly restless, large distances or short distances. Despite their different migration strategies, all of these birds have something in common: they face challenges to survive their "flyway" – a term used to describe the route...

Uncategorized / 03.05.2017

Blogpost written by Alexander Cotnoir, Volunteer with Rios Saludables Program   Hello everybody! My name is Alexander Cotnoir, and before I share a snapshot of my work at Osa Conservation thus far along with some of the most exciting experiences I’ve had working with the Ríos Saludables Program, I’d like to introduce myself and share why I decided to join the Ríos Saludables Program as a volunteer over the course of the next few months.     I am currently a sophomore at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, pursuing a degree in biology...

Uncategorized / 25.04.2017

March 13, 2017 Blogpost by Max Beal, Northland College   After packing our bags on the last night of midterms, we all woke up bright and early to catch the 7:00 AM colectivo to start our journey into Corcovado National Park, a little up the coast from Osa Conservation’s biological station. We met up with our guide Maikol on the colectivo and an hour and half later we all got off in the small community of Carate and started our 20 km hike along the beach to Sirena station that serves as...

Uncategorized / 18.04.2017

Blogpost written by Alejandra Rojas, Naturalist Guide and Avian Program Coordinator As we prepare to celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2017, we reflect on the conservation work that we are doing in the special region of the world called the Osa Peninsula. This especially includes the importance of sustainable natural resource management and effective strategic forest restoration for protecting the globally significant biodiversity of the Osa Peninsula in perpetuity. Looking back through the years, we see various historical environmental trends throughout the region and how they have shaped...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2017

March 1, 2017 Blogpost by Max Beal, Northland College   After catching a ride in a cattle truck from Rincon, we unloaded our things and settled into our new home at Osa Conservation’s Lomas del Sierpe field station. The station sits just off the road high up on a hill surrounded by dense jungle. We spent the rest of the day furnishing our concrete platform with hammocks and bins, and enjoying the running water, electricity, and refrigeration. Instead of tents, we were able to fit ourselves into a couple of screened-in...

Uncategorized / 04.04.2017

February 22, 2017 Blogpost by Carolina May (College of William and Mary)   After returning from our backpacking trip to Osa Conservation’s Cerro Arbolito, we spent the afternoon writing up Grinnell journal entries that described all of the species and ecological observations we noticed on our hike. The rest of the week we continued with field projects around the biological station. On early Wednesday morning, we went with Manuel, Osa Conservation's sea turtle research coordinator, to survey the beaches for turtle nests. Once we reached the beach, we turned our headlamps...