Community Outreach / 28.11.2019

Blog by David Mattey, Wildlife Protection Technician The White-Lipped Peccary is a threatened species of great ecological importance for the composition of tropical forests. Therefore, it is necessary to take measures to protect them, since it is a highly hunted species for its meat. For a few months, before the migration of the peccary in the rainy season, the planning process for community monitoring and protection begins, together with the community's biological monitoring group, members of the Association of Volunteers for Service in Protected Areas (ASVO), who offered their...

Community Outreach / 01.10.2019

Blog by Marco Hidalgo-Chaverri, Ecosystem Resilience and Community Outreach Program Learning means incorporating new ways of relating our experiences with reality. This progression is carried out through two complementary processes: the assimilation of data from the objective reality to the subject, and the redefinition of the subject's relationship with that reality. During the training processes on basic environmental monitoring concepts, members of communities share knowledge about their own familiar experiences. This educational action is part of a process that empowers the members of a group to take over the management...

Community Outreach, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 04.07.2019

Blogspot by: Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Botanical projects coordinator –OC Trees are important components of the forests and our lives, however, deforestation and illegal logging are threatening their existence and contributing to climate change. This year, the United Nations declared the decade of the Restoration of Ecosystems in order to strengthen large-scale degraded and destroyed areas. This was initiated as a proven measure to combat the climate crisis and improve food security, water supply and biodiversity. Every June 15 we remember ‘the day of the tree’, an environmental event...

Aves, Birds, Community Outreach, Science and Research / 18.06.2019

Blogpost by Johan Ortíz, Restoration and Rewilding Field Technician My name is Johan Ortiz, and I am from the community of Puerto Jiménez. I am a lover of nature who enjoys working in it. As well as getting to enjoy these beautiful surroundings that Mother Nature gives us, it gives me great pleasure to do my bit to help protect and conserve nature. Johan Ortiz participating in one of his favorite activities--bird watching--during an eBird Big Day. Photo: Hilary Brumberg I would like to tell you about a great...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 15.05.2019

Blogpost by Jonathan Navarro Picado, Healthy Rivers Program Coordinator Children teach us new things every day and they are full of surprises; the only thing they need is a bit of motivation.  The community of Alto Laguna in Osa, the only indigenous reserve on the Osa Peninsula, is full of forest, life, stunning sunsets and inspiring people. The students of the school in the community received a talk about the importance of the rivers. But more than teaching them, they taught us through art the understanding they have of this...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 04.05.2019

By Irene Artiñano Banegas, Student in the first annual Costa Rican Restoration & Rewilding Field Course Restoration & Rewilding Field Course participants travelled across the Osa Peninsula to learn about conservation threats and initiatives in the region. Here, Irene, Osa Conservation staff, other course participants visit the Terraba-Sierpe Wetland. Photo: Michelle Monge I learned a lot during my two months in the Restoration & Rewilding Field Course at Osa Conservation. Our adventures included installing camera traps to monitor the activity of different mammals, walking through the forest learning (and hearing...

Aquatic Health, Community Outreach, Environmental Education / 29.03.2019

https://youtu.be/vjubdLJZJv8 Blogpost by Kristina Graves, Healthy Rivers Program Research Field Assistant and Masters Student at Imperial College London Having just arrived at the start of the week, I was really excited to hear that Osa Conservation was hosting a “Picnic in the River” in celebration of Costa Rican rivers and their importance to people and wildlife. I thought it would be a great way to understand the context of rivers in the Osa and community and throw myself headfirst into learning some Spanish.  “Picnic in the River” is an annual festival...

Birds, Community Outreach, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Sea Turtles, Volunteers and Visitors / 20.03.2019

Blogpost by Robin Morris and Steve Pearce, General Volunteers It seems like yesterday when we walked through the gate to the Osa Verde BioStation (Piro) for the first time in January 2017 and were greeted by a group scarlet macaws in the trees snacking and squawking.  We’re here now for our third winter excursion, and I have to admit we’ve done some cool things the last couple years.   Robin enjoying a two-year-old balsa forest. During Robin and Steve's 2018 visit, they helped clear plants around the small balsa saplings,...

Aves, Birds, Community Outreach, Science and Research / 10.01.2019

Blogpost por Arlet Quiros-Calvo, ganador de la Beca Alvaro Ugalde y estudiante de maestría en la Universidad de Costa Rica Macho y hembra de izquierda a derecha de tangara hormiguera carinegra (H. atrimaxillaris). Fotos: Arlet Quiros-Calvo  Me llamo Arlet, trabajo con una especie en peligro de extinción, especial porque se encuentra en un único lugar del mundo. La tangara hormiguera carinegra, Habia atrimaxillaris, habita solamente en la Península de Osa y en el Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Golfito-Parque Nacional Piedras Blancas en Costa Rica.  Se cree que su población está disminuyendo...

Community Outreach, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Sustainable agriculture / 28.11.2018

Blogpost by Charlotte Watteyn, doctoral researcher at KU Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Costa Rica, collaborating with Osa Conservation If you think about vanilla, you immediately start to imagine delicious ice creams, cakes and other yummy sweets. But where does this vanilla come from? Well, it is extracted from the fruits (beans or pods) of orchid vines, producing an intense aroma resulting from a complex of molecules. These orchids belong to the genus Vanilla (Orchidaceae), a diverse group of climbing hemi-epiphytes growing around trees with their aerial roots. The...