Community Outreach, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Sustainable agriculture / 28.11.2018

Blogpost by Charlotte Watteyn, doctoral researcher at KU Leuven (Belgium) and the University of Costa Rica, collaborating with Osa Conservation If you think about vanilla, you immediately start to imagine delicious ice creams, cakes and other yummy sweets. But where does this vanilla come from? Well, it is extracted from the fruits (beans or pods) of orchid vines, producing an intense aroma resulting from a complex of molecules. These orchids belong to the genus Vanilla (Orchidaceae), a diverse group of climbing hemi-epiphytes growing around trees with their aerial roots. The...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 14.11.2018

Blog Post by Elène Haave Audet, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant   [caption id="attachment_11964" align="aligncenter" width="448"] Elène holding a Noctilio leporinus, the Greater bulldog bat, which fishes from streams. Photo: Doris Audet[/caption] For many of us, the creatures of the tropical forest that dare venture at night remain elusive and mysterious beings, their ways of life foreign to us daytime dwellers. Among these enigmatic animals are bats, the group of mammals with the second largest number of species in the world, whose charismatic presence in the tropics will not go...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 08.08.2017

Blog Post written by Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Research Field Assistant Biodiversity & Conservation I love vanilla! But did you ever wonder where it comes from? From the vanilla bean. But not from a tree; it comes from an orchid, which grows up the tree as a vine. However, it is not that simple. Each flower opens for only 24 hours and must be pollinated within 8-12 hours. If pollination does not occur the flower wilts, drops from the vine, and no pods are produced. The vanilla bean’s pollen is...

Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 19.08.2014

This blog piece was taken and translated directly from Osa Conservation's Wetland Program Coordinator, Andres Jimenez, and his very own personal blog. *** While I wait here for the fog on my camera to evaporate, and while the few clean clothes I have left are drying, and while none of my shoes are fully covered in mud, here I am dedicating myself to editing photos and writing this blog! Little did I imagine (although one always has hopes) that on a rainy night…wait…let me correct myself - during the deluge,...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Marine Conservation / 15.07.2014

Written by: Luis Alberto Williams Fallas Translated by: Florencia Franzini We find ourselves in the middle of a project titled “Conservation and Management of Marine and Forest Resources in the National Terraba Sierpe Wetlands.” Our associates are APREMMA: a local community of fishermen and piangüeros working out of the Ajuntaderas area, a small community off the Southern Pacific coast of Costa Rica. This newly formed group is looking for a method to develop a healthy relationship between their community and efforts to conserve the local wetlands. APREMAA, like many of the...

Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Marine Conservation / 14.04.2014

Written by: Juan Carlos Cruz Diaz Edited by: Florencia Franzini One of the most charismatic animals of the rainforest is definitely the river otter. These animals, related to the weasel family, live in large family near rivers and streams where they form social groups of up to fifteen individuals. [caption id="attachment_6047" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Otter in the Piro River, Photo Credit: Manuel Sánchez.[/caption] River otters can also be found in bodies of water that lie close to rivers, such as estuaries and beaches with rock formations. They are active from early hours of the...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 05.03.2014

This two-part series chronicles the efforts of Osa Conservation and Amazon Conservation Team to learn from one another’s conservation strategies through staff visits to each other's field sites and the ensuing exchange of knowledge and experience.   My first time in the Amazon by Agustín Mendoza, Land Stewardship and Maintenance, Osa Conservation [caption id="attachment_5846" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Agustín (right, tan shirt) talks about native seed collection and forest restoration.[/caption] I arrived on the Osa Peninsula well over 39 years ago; since I was young I worked the land with my father, through him learning the...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 26.02.2014

This two-part series chronicles the efforts of Osa Conservation and Amazon Conservation Team to learn from one another’s conservation strategies through staff visits to each other's field sites and the ensuing exchange of knowledge and experience.   My trip to Costa Rica and the Osa Peninsula by Wilmar Diaz Bahamón, Field Projects Manager, ACT Colombia [caption id="attachment_5848" align="aligncenter" width="428"] Agustin shows Wilmar and ACT how to climb trees to collect native seeds in the forest.[/caption] I was born in the countryside. As a child I explored my small town walking for hours in...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Miscellaneous / 12.02.2014

[caption id="attachment_5289" align="alignnone" width="857"] Térraba-Sierpe National Wetlands, Costa Rica. Photo credit: Cavu[/caption] By: Luis Williams Community Planning - Wetlands Program A functional environment is built on a day-to-day basis, from all sectors of society, and a fundamental support for environmental security comes from the participation of local citizens. In many cases, local organizations become protagonists that can either complement or detract from the government’s role in supporting a functioning environment. At Osa Conservation, we aim to highlight the responsibility of citizen participation by presenting useful information to voters during this year’s...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Marine Conservation / 18.11.2013

by Lauren Lipuma, Conservation Outreach Coordinator, and Ándres Jiménez, Wetlands Program Coordinator [caption id="attachment_5289" align="alignnone" width="857"] Térraba-Sierpe wetlands, Costa Rica. Photo credit: Cavu[/caption]   OC’s conservation efforts in the Térraba-Sierpe wetlands have gotten off to a great start! Our wetlands program, started earlier this year, aims to strengthen the presence of government and conservation organizations in the Térraba-Sierpe National Wetlands and to develop sustainable economic opportunities for neighboring communities. In addition to housing a diverse array of wildlife, wetlands perform important ecological functions - from water filtration to carbon storage. Mangroves...