Aquatic Health, Community Outreach, Environmental Education / 29.03.2019

https://youtu.be/vjubdLJZJv8 Blogpost by Kristina Graves, Healthy Rivers Program Research Field Assistant and Masters Student at Imperial College London Having just arrived at the start of the week, I was really excited to hear that Osa Conservation was hosting a “Picnic in the River” in celebration of Costa Rican rivers and their importance to people and wildlife. I thought it would be a great way to understand the context of rivers in the Osa and community and throw myself headfirst into learning some Spanish.  “Picnic in the River” is an annual festival...

Aquatic Health, Volunteers and Visitors / 12.12.2018

Blog por Lucía Vargas Araya, Coordinadora de Experiencia de Conservación. La autora Lucía Vargas Araya disfruta de la búsqueda de vida silvestre en el sendero. Photo: Laurien Dwars “Hay dos pumas en el sendero”- me dijo mi compañero Leiner por un mensaje que recibí estando sentada en mi oficina en la Estación Biológica Osa Verde el otro día. Emocionada, le avisé a los compañeros que estaban cerca mío, nos pusimos zapatos y salimos rápidamente hacia El Sendero Las Tortugas, donde esperábamos encontrar a los felinos. La entrada del sendero está justo...

Aquatic Health, Community Outreach, Uncategorized / 07.11.2017

Blogpost by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Students in bright blue uniforms dip nets into a small stream and retrieve soggy masses of leaves, branches, rocks, and candy wrappers. They comb through the leaves with plastic spoons, and excitedly pluck small insects and crustaceans from the foliage and place them into the stream water filled ice cube tray  - our fancy specimen holder. The students rush the specimens over to our identification station, a tree stump bearing a laminated booklet with dozens of pictures of aquatic critters. They methodically scan each...

Aquatic Health, Marine Conservation / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez The world’s seafood stocks will have completely collapsed by the year 2050, scientists say.  According to a study done by a group of economists and ecologists, the growth of the human population combined with unsustainable fishing practices and the devastating loss of biodiversity will lead to the collapse of fish populations in the next 35 years, if trends continue on their current path. [caption id="attachment_9221" align="alignleft" width="199"] Image from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/[/caption] If the idea of losing all of the world’s fish scares you as much as it scares me,...

Aquatic Health, Environmental Education, Marine Conservation, Sea Turtles, Volunteers and Visitors / 16.10.2015

The fluttering of papery wings; back and forth, back and forth. They open and close their tiny mouths. Nocturnal hungry bats, paired with the incessant whir of cicada wings and the low, ominous drone of Howler monkeys are the evening calls of the Osa. These sounds signify the awakening of all things that dwell in the night. Usually, it also signifies our bedtime; unless it’s an evening of turtle patrol. When I took herpetology as a senior in college three years ago, my professor used to joke that, “Herpetologists...