Science and Research / 21.11.2018

Blog Post by Brandon André Güell, NSF Pre-doctoral Fellow and Ph.D. Student, Warkentin Lab, Boston University [caption id="attachment_11992" align="aligncenter" width="522"] Brandon Güell observing a breeding aggregation at Shampoo Pond. Photo: Brandon Güell[/caption] It was about 06:00 after night-long heavy rains ended a short dry spell, and already you could hear a deafening chorus of creatures gathering at the pond. Though sleepless and mosquito-ridden, we trudged chest-deep through the murky swamp waters with notebook and camera in hand to reach the source of the chaos. That’s when we saw it: One...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 14.11.2018

Blog Post by Elène Haave Audet, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant   [caption id="attachment_11964" align="aligncenter" width="448"] Elène holding a Noctilio leporinus, the Greater bulldog bat, which fishes from streams. Photo: Doris Audet[/caption] For many of us, the creatures of the tropical forest that dare venture at night remain elusive and mysterious beings, their ways of life foreign to us daytime dwellers. Among these enigmatic animals are bats, the group of mammals with the second largest number of species in the world, whose charismatic presence in the tropics will not go...

Aquatic Health, Community Outreach, Uncategorized / 07.11.2017

Blogpost by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Students in bright blue uniforms dip nets into a small stream and retrieve soggy masses of leaves, branches, rocks, and candy wrappers. They comb through the leaves with plastic spoons, and excitedly pluck small insects and crustaceans from the foliage and place them into the stream water filled ice cube tray  - our fancy specimen holder. The students rush the specimens over to our identification station, a tree stump bearing a laminated booklet with dozens of pictures of aquatic critters. They methodically scan each...

Aquatic Health, Marine Conservation / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez The world’s seafood stocks will have completely collapsed by the year 2050, scientists say.  According to a study done by a group of economists and ecologists, the growth of the human population combined with unsustainable fishing practices and the devastating loss of biodiversity will lead to the collapse of fish populations in the next 35 years, if trends continue on their current path. [caption id="attachment_9221" align="alignleft" width="199"] Image from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/[/caption] If the idea of losing all of the world’s fish scares you as much as it scares me,...

Marine Conservation, Science and Research, Sea Turtles / 11.12.2015

Written by: Sukee Bennett There’s something about measuring squirming sea turtle hatchlings that automatically puts a smile on my face. But this batch of babies was extra special. They were from a nest that I relocated on my very first patrol on Piro, way back in the beginning of September. A little over fifty days later, and the ping-pong shaped eggs I once placed in a bucket and buried in the hatchery had resulted in one hundred flipper-flapping babies. I was enthralled. Flash-forward two hours later, when my fellow Research...

Science and Research / 30.11.2015

  [caption id="attachment_8787" align="alignleft" width="300"] Male of Calynda coronata[/caption] In early November 2015 we traveled to Osa in order to research the stick insect fauna of the Peninsula. It was due to the kindness of Max Villalobos, the Operations Manager of Osa Conservation, that we were allowed to search and collect in the Osa Conservation area.   Stick Insects (Phasmatodea) can be found in Costa Rica with 3000 species currently known in the tropics around the world.  They are herbivores and well-known for resembling twigs or branches. Therefore, they have great camouflage....

Environmental Education, Miscellaneous, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 06.11.2015

Read about Grace Leppink's experience in the Osa as she makes exciting fungi discoveries! Fungi are found throughout the world, but some of the most amazing and diverse fungi are found in Costa Rica.  The combination of deeply shaded forests and a warm, humid climate makes Costa Rica the perfect incubator for fungi.  As a new mycologist, the opportunity to travel to Costa Rica was one that I could not pass up.  On my first day at the Piro Research Station I had an exciting and lucky encounter with fungi. [caption...

Aquatic Health, Environmental Education, Marine Conservation, Sea Turtles, Volunteers and Visitors / 16.10.2015

The fluttering of papery wings; back and forth, back and forth. They open and close their tiny mouths. Nocturnal hungry bats, paired with the incessant whir of cicada wings and the low, ominous drone of Howler monkeys are the evening calls of the Osa. These sounds signify the awakening of all things that dwell in the night. Usually, it also signifies our bedtime; unless it’s an evening of turtle patrol. When I took herpetology as a senior in college three years ago, my professor used to joke that, “Herpetologists...

Birds, Environmental Education, Science and Research / 05.10.2015

Read about Esmeralda Quirós Guerrero's research on the singing patterns of birds in the Osa. The intense biodiversity around our stations provided her with a perfect place to conduct her research. We love learning more about the incredible birds of the Osa! Did you know that many species of birds sing duets? Vocal displays are one of the most researched interactions between and within species. There is a great diversity in the structure of singing behavior. I have been investigating the learning process of duets in Osa songbirds. Duets...

Environmental Education, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 21.08.2015

Bats. These nocturnal creatures tend to get a bad rap. Associated for centuries with mythical creatures of the night, and used as Halloween decorations to add eeriness to a haunted house, the real life mammal often gets overlooked. OC aims to change that by collaborating with experts and educating the public on the crucial role bats play in restoration. [gallery columns="1" size="full" ids="8019"] Recently, Osa Conservation was honored with a visit from 2 remarkable scientists in the bat world: Cullen Geiselman, bat biologist and board member of Bat Conservation International & Gloriana Chaverri,...