Uncategorized / 25.09.2015

Research Field Assistant - Erin Peeling Arriving at the field station on Day One: I was accepted to be a Research Field Assistant for the Sea Turtle Conservation program in late August 2015. Within two weeks, I was already off to Costa Rica. Because everything happened so quickly, I was nervous about what my job would be like and how I would adjust to living in a new country. Despite my worries, I could not have asked for a better time volunteering here on the Osa Peninsula. [caption id="attachment_8354" align="alignleft" width="305"] Me...

Uncategorized / 04.09.2015

[caption id="attachment_8196" align="alignleft" width="366"] Pilar (far right) explains and demonstrates the dissolved oxygen test.[/caption] Last week, the Osa Conservation Rios Saludables team joined four staff members from the Lapa Rios Ecolodge for their second monthly chemical and biological assessment of Rio Carbonero's stream health. Pilar Bernal (Education Outreach Coordinator) led the chemical portion of the monitoring, walking us through testing water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, conductivity, alkalinity, and nitrates. Julieta Chan, the Lapa Rios Ecolodge Experience Manager, took detailed notes and filmed most of the workshop. Jim Palmer,...

Uncategorized / 28.08.2015

We have the best staffers at our stations! They really go above and beyond to involve themselves in the environment and to inspire others to do the same. Osa Conseravation enables high schools, universities and school groups to learn, hands-on, in our field courses. Students get an amazing chance to actively learn important lessons with dedicated researchers in the paradise that is Costa Rica! Read below for the unique perspective of an OC Resarch Field Assistant leading these educational excursions. One of the greatest pleasures of working at Osa Conservation is being able...

Uncategorized / 14.05.2015

Submitted by: Rebecca Trinh In Osa, beach field work is dictated by the behavior of the waves. Here, we are used to large waves, high tides, and strong rip currents that keep us out of the water, even on the hottest of days. But this past week, our shores were bombarded by monster waves that were truly impressive in their ability to restructure the beachscape. The ocean is a formidable force here, taunting you as you awkwardly trudge through the hot sand hunting for just the right hermit crab....

Uncategorized / 06.05.2015

Submitted by: Manuel Sánchez Mendoza, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator This is the time of year that we begin the construction of a new sea turtle hatchery, with means removing plants and cleaning and filtering the sand where the eggs will be relocated will be part of our daily activities over the next several weeks and we prepare a new place for the nests that need to be relocated. Last year, we had help from many people in this big and important project, including help from volunteers, research assistants, high schools,...

Uncategorized / 01.05.2015

Beautiful Streams – A Declaration of Love to Our Rivers Imagine it is hot, very humid and hot, and you are trying to catch every breeze that is coming to you on the way through the camp or the jungle. Even if it is only 8 o’clock in the morning you will start to sweat and you cannot stop it, even if you try not to move at all. Given that these circumstances occur here on the Osa Peninsula, there is nothing better than having your workplace not just in...

Uncategorized / 29.04.2015

Few sensations are strong enough to leave an impression. A 3 a.m. march along Pejeperro beach is one of them. Phosphorescent plankton light up with every step, mirroring the Milky Way above. At times the sea air is so thick with mist that it feels like breathing underwater. A red toned light can be used from time to time if needed, however it is often avoided to minimize interference with the turtles. Over time the beach becomes a long tunnel of sounds and smells, punctuated by tiny scraps...

Uncategorized / 21.04.2015

Submitted by: Pilar Bernal, Environmental Education & Community Outreach Manager This past Saturday, April 18, we celebrated Earth Day in the community of Puerto Jiménez, an activity organized by ASCONA (National Association of Community and Environmental Service) in which other organizations joined together to carry out a fun, educational celebration for the participants. Presentations were given on the terrestrial and marine ecosystems of the Osa Peninsula, as well as the traditional timber uses of the forests. The children had fun and learned through storytelling, treasure hunts, and a play called "Living...

Uncategorized / 15.04.2015

Juan Carlos Cruz, Osa Conservation's Feline Program Coordinator, provides some insight and history behind the incredible Jaguar sightings our camera traps have recently provided: "The Jaguar is the biggest wild cat species in the Americas and the third biggest in the world after the Lion and the Tiger. It is so big, individuals weighing up to 300 pounds have been found in the Amazon. But being so big means that Jaguars rely on big species of prey, such as peccaries, deer, sea turtles and even tapirs. In the Osa, the Jaguar's home...

Uncategorized / 08.04.2015

Submitted by: David G Larson, Augustana Campus, University of Alberta, Canada Photo credits: DG Larson More than 6,000 species of moths are thought to be found in Costa Rica, and many hundreds of those moth species are found in the wet tropical forests of Osa Conservation. Micro insects, especially micro moths with wing lengths of less than 1cm, fill the air just after sundown and are often the target of the early evening insectivorous bats. Macro moths with 1-15 cm wing lengths usually become more active later in the evening. The...