Uncategorized / 07.04.2015

Costa Rica and the Osa particularly boasts many claims to fame; its frequently cited as the happiest nation on earth; as containing the ‘biodiversity nucleus of the world; and recently, it may have popped up on your news feed as having derived 100% of its energy from renewable sources so far in 2015. All laudable claims to fame! Less frequently celebrated, however, is the nation’s cuisine. Menus in Cost Rica, along with much of Central and South America, are often described as consisting of two choices: Beans and Rice...

Uncategorized / 31.03.2015

My name is Erin Engbeck, I have been volunteering at Osa Conservation for 4 ½ months as a Research Field Assistant for the Ríos Saludables de Osa program. During my time here, I have collected baseline data throughout the Osa Peninsula and had the wonderful opportunity to work directly with community members through workshops and community events.   Our workshops are aimed at educating the community and getting their involvement for future monitoring efforts. In February, we took Ríos Saludables on the road to San Josecito, a small community...

Uncategorized / 18.03.2015

Submitted by: Alejandro Muñoz, M.Sc., Osa Healthy Rivers Collaborator In a new activity carried out under the Osa Healthy Rivers framework, six representatives of communities located throughout the length of the Peninsula got together at Piro Research Station to learn about monitoring the physicochemical and biological conditions of the rivers. This workshop, which took place from Friday, February 27 to Saturday, February 28, had the participation of representatives from ASADA (Administrative Associations for Aqueducts and Sewers) and the La Palma school, ASADA representatives from Sándalo, and officials from the sea turtle...

Uncategorized / 16.03.2015

Hola, [caption id="attachment_7678" align="alignright" width="300"] Photo Credit: Lina Jerrå[/caption] My name is Sofia, I am originally from Sweden, I have a Master’s degree in conservation biology and I have been on Osa Peninsula working as a Research Field Assistant for Osa Conservation for two months. I work for the Sea Turtle program, collecting data and working with turtle conservation based on nesting activity on the two beaches Piro and Pejeperro. Sea turtles are endangered species. Some of the biggest problems are habitat destruction, climate change and human threats, both in water...

Uncategorized / 25.02.2015

Submitted by: Pilar Bernal, Environmental Education & Community Outreach Manager Nearing the date of the 2nd International Festival of Migratory Birds, which will be the 7th of March, we will be giving talks and going on excursions with students to motivate them to learn about birds and the importance of conserving them. Together with the organization Osa Birds, we will walk with students on different trails with the objectives of learning skills in the use of binoculars and bird identification guides; learning to observe birds in their different habitats; and...

Uncategorized / 07.02.2015

Submitted by: Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Feline Program Coordinator Strangler trees, mostly Fig trees, have evolved in a interesting way to take advantage of other trees for growing, especially in places where the thickness and canopy of the forest make scarce one of the most important elements in a plant’s life: light. The Osa Peninsula, one of the most biologically intense places in the world has more than 700 species of trees and 3000 species of plants which, in terms of competition and survival, is a lot for a plant. [caption...

Uncategorized / 28.07.2014

Written by: Pablo Porras Edited by: Florencia Franzini Osa Conservation’s Yellow-Billed Cotinga (Carpodectes antoniae) Sactuary is a special place born from the inspiration of a two-year monitoring and tracking program. After the hard work performed by fellow researchers, the only logical process that seemed to follow was for us to create a stronghold for this struggling, endemic bird – Today this little stronghold is the place where OC studies the local population of this endangered bird. [caption id="attachment_6809" align="alignleft" width="300"] YBC Sanctuary location as shown on GoogleMaps.[/caption] The Sanctuary is located in the...

Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 22.07.2014

Inspiration comes in many shapes and forms - the medium from which we craft our thoughts and feelings, too, are many. On his last visit to the Osa Peninsula Neil Deupree wrote this lovely poem in his journals, and he has so graciously decided to share  it with everyone so we too can experience a bit of the inspiration the Osa Peninsula has to offer. Thank you, Neil. *** OSA PENINSULA Sitting on the front porch at Piro The surf is distant thunder  - be sure to pack the poncho. The cicadas are way more than white noise in the background. The tortuguitos...

Environmental Education, Uncategorized / 07.07.2014

[caption id="attachment_6447" align="alignleft" width="300"] "Many termine species have soldiers with enlarged heads that have sharp, defensive mandibles. Worker termines, by comparison, have smaller heads with chewing mouthparts. The Mexican burrowing toad (Rhinophrynus doralis) feeds almost entirely on termines. It spends most of its life underground, emerging only to breed after heavy rains."[/caption] "They are creatures of interiors. Social but reclusive, all but a few shun the light of day, avoiding even the moonlight. They live underground, in logs or sealed nests, and conduct their social lives within dark labyrinths often...

Environmental Education, Science and Research, Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 23.06.2014

Written by: David Parreno Duque Translated by: Florencia Franzini [caption id="attachment_6262" align="alignleft" width="300"] Students receive a "creek talk" about the local Osa Ecosystem.[/caption] From June 12 to June 17 we had the pleasure of being able to work with a group of students from the La Paz Community School of Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The main on-going project that the alumni focused on was comparing water quality assessments of the Piro River and the Coyunda River – students examined and related the chemical composition of these two rivers, while also examining the different macroinvertebrates between the...