Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 22.07.2014

Inspiration comes in many shapes and forms - the medium from which we craft our thoughts and feelings, too, are many. On his last visit to the Osa Peninsula Neil Deupree wrote this lovely poem in his journals, and he has so graciously decided to share  it with everyone so we too can experience a bit of the inspiration the Osa Peninsula has to offer. Thank you, Neil. *** OSA PENINSULA Sitting on the front porch at Piro The surf is distant thunder  - be sure to pack the poncho. The cicadas are way more than white noise in the background. The tortuguitos...

Environmental Education, Uncategorized / 07.07.2014

[caption id="attachment_6447" align="alignleft" width="300"] "Many termine species have soldiers with enlarged heads that have sharp, defensive mandibles. Worker termines, by comparison, have smaller heads with chewing mouthparts. The Mexican burrowing toad (Rhinophrynus doralis) feeds almost entirely on termines. It spends most of its life underground, emerging only to breed after heavy rains."[/caption] "They are creatures of interiors. Social but reclusive, all but a few shun the light of day, avoiding even the moonlight. They live underground, in logs or sealed nests, and conduct their social lives within dark labyrinths often...

Environmental Education, Science and Research, Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 23.06.2014

Written by: David Parreno Duque Translated by: Florencia Franzini [caption id="attachment_6262" align="alignleft" width="300"] Students receive a "creek talk" about the local Osa Ecosystem.[/caption] From June 12 to June 17 we had the pleasure of being able to work with a group of students from the La Paz Community School of Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The main on-going project that the alumni focused on was comparing water quality assessments of the Piro River and the Coyunda River – students examined and related the chemical composition of these two rivers, while also examining the different macroinvertebrates between the...

Uncategorized / 27.05.2014

Written By Manuel Sanchez Translated and Edited by Florencia Franzini [caption id="attachment_6178" align="alignleft" width="300"] A Spider Monkey Foraging for Food.[/caption] The Geoffrey's Spider Monkey (ateles geoffroyi) that inhabits the Osa Peninsula has a major role in the forests on the peninsula: these charismatic creatures are both crucial for seed dispersal and also double as health indicators for forests. A common day in the life of a spider monkey consists of a family group of 20 to 40 individuals whom separate into smaller groups of 3 to 8 that forage during the day,...

Uncategorized / 13.05.2014

Written by: Pilar Bernal Translated & Edited by: Florencia Franzini On April 23rd I was invited to participate in the 10th annual Biodiversity Symposium of the Osa Peninsula, sponsored by the Conservation Area of Osa (ACOSA), in order to promote the exchange of ideas and give rise to awareness of the newly marked biodiversity zones, to a sensitive and environmentally active public. The previous years talks in the symposium had included mainly land issue topics focusing on trees, primates, bats, and aves, but this year we kick-started the conversations with...

Science and Research, Uncategorized, Wildcats / 05.12.2013

by Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Science Program Manager Mammals are a very important element in ecosystems, and the rainforest is no exception. Wildcats as the top predators in an ecosystem provide control for the lower levels of the food web such as herbivorous animals, which in turn control biomass production. Everything is in perfect balance, so if a top predator is missing from the ecosystem, herbivores will increase in number and that will tremendously affect the biomass production, potentially leading to ecosystem collapse. For this reason it is highly important...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Uncategorized, Wildcats / 18.09.2013

by Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Science Manager, and Brigid Prouse, Science Program Assistant [caption id="attachment_5395" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Brigid Prouse, Science Program Assistant[/caption] Environmental education is a crucial element for promoting and teaching the importance of conservation to communities and individuals. By having a solid environmental education and outreach program, we can promote long term appreciation, awareness and respect for our environment. For this reason, a few months ago, as part of the Science Program at Osa Conservation, we started delivering a series of talks to locals, schools and tourists in...

Aves, Birds, Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 13.09.2013

[caption id="attachment_5363" align="aligncenter" width="500"] A pair of Vermiculated Screech Owls. Photo by Alan Dahl[/caption]   Fall is fast approaching, and the change of seasons signals something particularly exciting for the Osa Peninsula – the return of migrating birds! The Osa is home to almost 500 resident bird species and many more who migrate to the peninsula from boreal forests in the US and Canada. Now in the middle of September, the migratory bird season is well under way, with species such as the Golden-winged warbler, Olive-Sided Flycatcher, and the Baltimore...

Uncategorized / 25.07.2013

Home to dozens of marine species, including the four turtles known to nest in the Osa, two species of dolphins, and even Whale Sharks, Gulfo Dulce is an incredible addition to the biodiverse rainforest that surrounds it (Bessesen, 2011). An inlet, protected from the rough waters of the Pacific, and with waters as deep as 300 meters, it is the perfect birthing spot for many animals, especially the majestic Humpback Whale (Golfo Dulce). This calm water paradise is also a beautiful and popular boating spot for locals and tourists, and...

Uncategorized / 22.07.2013

[gallery columns="2"] By Hansel Herrera Vargas The 2013 volunteer season began in the month of July and it seems good times are on their way… With so many volunteers on the calendar, dozens of sea turtles arriving on our beaches, and the hard work of the field assistants and interns, Osa Conservation is opening its doors and is beginning the 2013 volunteer season.  The first volunteers arrived last Friday and during a patrol had the good fortune of finding one of the most precious visitors of the Osa Peninsula.  On Sunday night...