Uncategorized / 17.01.2019

Blog por Marco Hidalgo, coordinador del programa de resiliencia del ecosistema y alcance comunitario La cacería de animales silvestres, en el caso de la Península de Osa, tiene claras características para ser considerada como un elemento cultural de las personas que la practican. Estas características se cumplen mayormente con quienes practican el monteo y con quienes cazan exclusivamente para consumir la carne. La gran mayoría de estos casos ya no se considera una práctica, sino una costumbre o tradición. Pero esta valoración de elemento cultural no es válido para...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Uncategorized / 19.12.2018

Blogpost by Elene Haave Audet, Restoration & Rewilding Research Field Assistant This October, I ventured out of the sanctity of the jungle to present at the 48thNorth American Symposium on Bat Research (NASBR) in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Over 300 researchers from across the globe gathered to share bat stories, communicate their research, and further our understanding of this hugely diverse mammalian group. Because of its location, the conference offered many opportunities to discuss the conservation of bats in the tropics, presenting a great opportunity to share Osa Conservation’s work...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Uncategorized / 05.12.2018

Blogpost by Alice Connell, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant [caption id="attachment_12037" align="aligncenter" width="421"] Alice monitoring the effectiveness of log piles in attracting amphibian and reptile species to the restoration and rewilding plots. Photo: Sophie Blow[/caption] My work is never the same from one day to the next on the Restoration and Rewilding Program, which encompasses many diverse projects that require frequent monitoring. There is plenty to do, I always arrive at lunch hungry and satisfied after mornings of hard work. I want to give you an insight into my...

Uncategorized / 07.11.2018

Blog Post by Marco Hidalgo, Coordinator for Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse Our tropical forests, including the extensions of mangroves that slope down the south pacific, suffer a constant threat from different man-made factors. One of the most significant threats is the lack of predators and their prey, which have decreased due to recreational and cultural hunting in the Osa Peninsula. In the search for practical solutions on the ecosystem-level, Osa Conservation’s Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse project hopes to increase the resilience of ecosystems in the Osa Peninsula through the use...

Uncategorized / 31.10.2018

Blog Post by José Luis Molina Quirós, Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship Awardee Costa Rica has a great diversity of species and marine ecosystems that protect and provide food to hundreds of organisms in various phases of their life cycle. For example, El Golfo de Papagayo and Golfo Dulce are just a few of the many hot spots that harbor this diversity of marine species and ecosystems, but these species have not been completely protected. [caption id="attachment_11784" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Sampling of species (Lutjanus guttatus, L. peru and Centropumus viridis) product of artisanal fisheries.[/caption] Currently, our country...

Uncategorized / 24.10.2018

Blogposts written by Research Field Assistants Mariam Weyand, Bryan Graybill, and Alexandra Mörth Rewarding Research Working as a research field assistant (RFA) for the Sea Turtle Conservation Program with Osa Conservation is really different from the other places I have worked for, and so far, it has been really rewarding. Every day, we conduct morning patrols to register any activity from the previous night and relocate nests that are at risk to the hatchery. I wake up between 3:45 and 5:00 a.m. depending on which beach I am going to patrol and on the...

Uncategorized / 16.10.2018

Blog Post by Breanna Hart Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” Osa Conservation has allowed me to both live and learn in a beautiful environment that no other place in the world can contest with. The spectacular view of the ocean and rainforest back-to-back lead me to a tropical wilderness and the fascinating creatures within it. One magnificent creature that spends time on the unique beaches is the turtle, and this is my experience with them: 4.30...

Uncategorized / 08.10.2018

Blog Post by James Purcell, Restoration and Rewilding Intern The daylight was rapidly disappearing, as we clambered through the thick undergrowth, over vines and palm leaves bigger than me, then across a muddy stream and still more dense brush. Then, we heard it again -  a long, mournful series of calls that sounded like a child laughing, or perhaps crying, in the distance. We all stopped, holding our breath; the only sounds were the omnipresent croaking of the frogs and the pumping of our excited hearts. Then, as casually as...

Uncategorized / 02.10.2018

Blog Post by Stanimira Deleva, Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship Awardee The Osa Peninsula is a place where, even after hundreds of exploratory expeditions, there is always something to be discovered. As one of the world's most biodiverse sites, the Osa is home to a vast variety of bats, most who use caves as a refuge, that have not yet been fully explored. I first visited the peninsula in 2015 to study the bats. Several of the bats that we caught in mist nets were cave-dwellers. I wondered where these bats...

Uncategorized / 26.09.2018

Blog Post By Marina Garrido, Restoration & Rewilding Program Assistant As one of the assistants of the Restoration & Rewilding Program, I am happy to announce a new project entitled “Creating the First Conservation Action Plan for the Endemic and Endangered Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog using Citizen Science and Tiny-Tech.” [caption id="attachment_11740" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Phyllobates vittatus posing perfectly for Robin Moore´s camera lens at Osa Conservation's Biological Station. Photo taken from the book In Search of Lost Frogs by Robin Moore.[/caption] Many of you might be wondering, what makes...