Uncategorized / 29.08.2018

Blog Post by Monica Espinoza, Marine Conservation Scientist The Térraba-Sierpe Wetland presents the most productive and biodiverse mangrove ecosystem in the South Pacific of Costa Rica. However, not everyone knows the importance of this habitat in our day to day life. For this reason, we decided to celebrate World Mangrove Day with the School of Ajuntaderas, Sierpe. Our special guests were the children of this community who learned about the importance of mangroves, fire prevention and waste management. It is important to recognize that boys and girls are carriers of...

Uncategorized / 15.08.2018

Blog Post by Noelia Hernández, Marine Programs Coordinator When you visit Osa's beaches of Piro and Peje Perro for the first time, it feels like a scene straight out of a movie; you can picture a shipwreck landing on one of these beautiful, untouched beaches, and the tourists becoming surrounded by nature, calm, and beauty. The trees, the mist in the background, the birds in the sky, the breaking waves, and the opportunity to see incredible species like turtles and whales all make you think that you are in a...

Uncategorized / 08.08.2018

Blog by Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Feline Program Coordinator It’s 5:30 am and the sun is rising above the Dry Forest of Guanacaste in northern Costa Rica. Researchers in Naranjo beach in Santa Rosa National Park in Guanacaste Conservation Area are getting ready to survey the beach. They walk along the shore looking for evidence of the presence of jaguars. Unlike in the Osa, at this beach it is common to encounter tracks left by jaguars who patrol the beach looking for prey. [caption id="attachment_11597" align="aligncenter" width="313"] Jaguar tracks along...

Uncategorized / 01.08.2018

Blog Post by Hilary Brumberg, River Health Program Coordinator It was a windy fall day when I joined a group of budding field researchers and nature enthusiasts to visit the Rocky Mountain National Park for the first time. As we hiked the trails, I was in constant awe of the breathtaking front-range views and the abundant wildlife, ranging from elk to butterflies to marmots to hummingbirds. But it wasn’t just the wildlife that left an impression on me. As I was browsing the gift shop before leaving, I happened upon a...

Uncategorized / 25.07.2018

Blog Post by Luis Carlos Solis, Mangrove Restoration Coordinator The Térraba Sierpe National Wetland encompasses the largest mangrove forest in Costa Rica with an area greater than 16,000 hectares which, due to its biological importance, was declared of international importance by the International Convention on Ramsar Wetlands. In this protected area, mangrove resources have been used since pre-Columbian times when indigenous communities extracted dye from the bark of the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) to dye their clothing. [caption id="attachment_11539" align="aligncenter" width="640"] A section of land cleared of invasive ferns[/caption] Currently, the...

Uncategorized / 18.07.2018

Blog post by Mónica Espinoza Miralles, Marine Conservation Scientist For those passionate about the underwater world it is amazing to see how extraordinarily different the seas are around the world. This was the case for us:  Noelia Hernández, an oceanographer from Spain and Osa Conservation's new Marine Program Coordinator, and myself, Mónica Espinoza, a marine biologist from Costa Rica and Osa Conservation's new Marine Conservation Scientist. We had the opportunity to meet for the first time at Saladero Ecolodge, and from that moment, we realized that we both have...

Uncategorized / 11.07.2018

Blog Post and Photos by Patrick Newcombe Osa Conservation’s landscape is a mosaic of terrestrial habitats including grasslands, palm forests, reforested areas, secondary and primary forests, as well as aquatic habitats such as a ponds, rivers, lagoons and ocean. Elevation ranges from sea level to 1,083 feet (330 meters). This habitat and elevation range result in phenomenal bird diversity and illustrate the importance of the habitat conservation and restoration occurring at Osa Conservation. June 25 was the first Big Day at Osa Conservation! In birding circles, a Big Day is...

Uncategorized / 27.06.2018

Photos and Blog Post by Thomas Meinzen, Restoration and Rewilding Intern and Birder At the Osa Conservation Biological Station, mornings in the rainforest are full of sound—birds, frogs, insects, and monkeys all chirping, singing, buzzing and howling in a unique concert. But not far away, where staff and volunteers are working to restore and rewild deforested pasture lands, the dawn chorus strikes a different tune. Many of the low whistles, creaks, and croaks of the forest are being replaced by new, often higher-pitched sounds. As a researcher and intern...

Uncategorized / 20.06.2018

Blogpost by Manuel Sanchez, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator and Wildlife Photographer There are more than 114 species of bats, and around 80 of these can be found in the Osa Peninsula. Some are so common that they practically live in our houses, while others are so difficult to spot that when you encounter one, you are caught off guard and can't help but think that no animal more incredible exists. It is said that the Osa contains more species of bats than the rest of Costa Rica, and I believe...

Uncategorized / 13.06.2018

Blog Post by Juan Carlos Cruz Díaz, Feline Program Coordinator When we talk about the jaguar, it is difficult to distinguish the many vital roles this iconic species plays. All throughout Latin America, the jaguar is deeply rooted in the indigenous culture. From a cultural point of view, it has been part of many artistic and cinematic works. From a conservationist point of view, it has been considered everything that a species can be: an umbrella species, a flagship species, a keystone species, an indicator species, and an apex predator. In...