Uncategorized / 04.04.2018

Blog Post by Sarah Karerat from Middlebury College [caption id="attachment_11207" align="aligncenter" width="940"] The beach during sunset at Osa; Photo by Manuel Sanchez[/caption] While spending our first night in our cabina at Osa, I awoke in the middle of the night to the noises that surrounded us.  The howler monkeys were screeching, rain was pouring, and I could hear insects and the Pacific Ocean crashing against the coast. I remember thinking that I may as well be sleeping outside.  During my stay, I truly felt like there was no barrier between me and...

Uncategorized / 28.03.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11180" align="aligncenter" width="632"] Underneath Osa's Canopy. Photo by Manuel Sánchez[/caption] As a Conservation Volunteer at Osa Conservation, I get the best of every world. I am taking a year off after graduating high school to explore my many interests in an attempt to better understand some of the subjects I am considering studying in college, one of which is biology. What better place to fully experience the life of a field biologist than at a research station in one of the most biologically intense...

Uncategorized / 20.03.2018

Blog written by Juan Carlos Crus Diaz, Feline Program Coordinator I can clearly remember:  It was a hot but humid morning, which is common in this area during the dry season. As we walk through the rainforest, we struggle to keep our pace on the trail - it is steep and the humidity make us feel like we are running a marathon. We come to the last hill and finally reach the ridge of the mountain chain that goes through Piedras Blancas National Park. We summit the top and...

Uncategorized / 14.03.2018

Blogpost written by Marvin López, Botanical Specialist [caption id="attachment_11074" align="aligncenter" width="4608"] Flowers of Aristolochia goudotii, a plant commonly called pipevine, in its natural habitat. It is a woody, evergreen, twining vine of the birthwort family that produces unusual apetulous flowers, each of which features a calyx resembling a dutchman’s pipe.[/caption] I have lived most of my life here, in the Osa Peninsula, one of the places with the most extensive forest cover of my country, Costa Rica. It holds a vast diversity of plant species, some of which are still unknown to...

Uncategorized / 07.03.2018

Post by Philip Przybyszewski, DC Office Intern. [caption id="attachment_11117" align="aligncenter" width="6000"] A view of the far-reaching canopy and the Pacific Ocean from up above.[/caption] No, this isn’t just an issue for raving environmentalists. This is a big deal for everyone. Even though they only cover 2% of the Earth’s surface, they are of utmost importance to all species, particularly humans. Tropical rainforests are the wettest, most vegetation-intense biomes in the world, so densely-grown that a canopy is formed that weaves together the ecosystem into a far-spanning green landscape. Incredibly, this ecosystem...

Uncategorized / 21.02.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11002" align="aligncenter" width="480"] Sydney's favorite stingless bee nest.[/caption] Studying bees can be tedious work, but not because of needing to carefully avoid the stingers. The bees I've been observing (thankfully) lack them, making it easy to get up close and personal with my little buzzing friends. Rather than getting stung, this work is difficult because the nests are very challenging to find. I've learned that field biology is not just recording data vast quantities of data all day. First, the subject must be...

Uncategorized / 14.02.2018

Blogpost written by Manuel Sánchez, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator and Wildlife Photographer The first rains. After six long months of the dry season, strong downpours have returned at last to wake the forest once more, and with them return the creatures that hid away from the rainless weather. The first glass frogs (Neobatrachia centrolenidae) begin to sing in the creeks and rivers, the water level gradually rising with the first floods of the year. The rainy season advances across in a roaring song, and various amphibian species begin to search...

Uncategorized / 06.02.2018

Blogpost written by Eli Boreth,  9 years old Conservation Volunteer This Butterfly Isn't Blue [caption id="attachment_10941" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Credit: Active Wild[/caption]   This is a Blue Morpho Butterfly. This butterfly lives in tropical and neotropical (which are slightly drier) rainforests in Mexico and Central America, and throughout South America. Although this butterfly looks blue, it has no blue pigment. It appears blue because of how its wing scales are structured. The wing scales are made up of cells that are shaped like Christmas trees. When light bounces off the “branches” of these...

Uncategorized / 02.02.2018

Blogpost written by Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnica   World Wetlands Day is celebrated on February 2 of each year, the date on which the Convention on Wetlands was adopted. Wetland is all those areas that remain flooded or at least, with soils saturated with water for long periods of time – thus, water defines its structure and ecological functions. Wetlands are vital for human survival. As one of the most productive ecosystems on the planet, they harbor a biological diversity and water sources on which countless species of plants...

Uncategorized / 03.01.2018

Blogpost by Luis Carlos Solis, Asistencia Técnica We are excited to present the results of the "First Junior Christmas Bird Count, Península de Osa 2017" in conjunction with the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, Fundación Neotrópica and 16 educational centers in the Osa. During this special day, participants saw a total of 93 different species and 595 individual birds! Throughout the event, school children learned about the importance of local and migratory birds and their habitat,  helping to create the next generation of guardians for Osa's natural heritage. The logo of...