Uncategorized / 23.08.2017

Blog Post by Lesley Mould, DC Office Intern Osa Conservation’s rainforest camera traps have been capturing some very exciting footage recently! One camera recorded a particularly remarkable video of a Greater Grison. Watching clips of the camera trap footage in the D.C. office motivated me to investigate some of the more unusual species that are native to the Osa, starting with the Greater Grison. The Greater Grison is a member of the weasel family. It is native to South and Central America and inhabits forest and cerrado habitats. It is...

Uncategorized / 14.08.2017

Blogpost written by Emily Bartone, Sea Turtle Research Field Assistant Working with the sea turtle program, I feel lucky to spend my mornings patrolling Osa’s picturesque beaches looking for nesting sea turtles. However, one feature that can often distract from the beauty of these beaches is the presence of plastic waste that still finds its way to the coastline. While this pollution is unsightly, more importantly, it’s harmful to wildlife. Despite ongoing beach clean ups,  plastics can accumulate on our beaches because it washes up with the tide. What doesn’t make...

Uncategorized / 02.08.2017

Blog Post by Eleanor Flatt, Biodiversity and Restoration Research Field Assistant and Dung Beetle enthusiast It is 1 o’clock in the morning, rain is breaking through the forest canopy. It is pitch black, and I am just about to wriggle out of my jungle hammock to check pitfall traps … again. This experience was not due to insanity, but for science. Specifically, my aim is to observe when distinct species of dung beetles are most active to better understand their role in the ecosystem. This task is just part...

Uncategorized / 25.07.2017

Blogpost written by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Hello fellow nature enthusiasts! My name is Hilary Brumberg, and I am the new coordinator of the Ríos Saludables (Healthy Rivers) program. I just graduated from Wesleyan University in Connecticut a few weeks ago with a degree in environmental science and Spanish, and I am a Princeton in Latin America fellow. My day-to-day activities here in the Osa Peninsula are very different from those in urban Connecticut. Each morning, I crawl out of my bug net and emerge among the mango trees on...

Uncategorized / 07.07.2017

Blogpost by Sawyer Judge "Was your coral scouting successful?" I hear a lovely British accent come calling from the stairs. Two dogs come bounding down the stairs to the beach as Harvey is helping us out of the boat. The owner of the accent, Susan, makes her way towards us. "How was the boat ride, loves? Come refresh with some juice in the kitchen. It's cas juice! Fresh made!" There are six of us visiting the Saladero EcoLodge that Harvey and Susan call home. Harvey and Susan are long-time partners of Osa Conservation, and they're housing us...

Uncategorized / 14.06.2017

Blogpost written by Lesley Mould, Intern Since vanilla is so popular, it was surprising to learn how challenging it is to grow it in the wild! Vanilla is one of the many rare and distinct plants that can be found in the Osa. The uniqueness of the vanilla plant is fascinating, and its potential to both reforest and spur regional development is heartening in a field that can often be cynical.  As an intern in Osa Conservation’s Washington, D.C. office with a strong interest in botany, I find the...

Uncategorized / 06.06.2017

Blogpost written by Robert Baker, Volunteer Hi, my name is Bob Baker. For the past 10 years, my wife Lindsay and I have come to the Osa Peninsula for two weeks every March. We come to enjoy what National Geographic calls the “most biologically intense place on earth.” We typically stay in vacation rentals in the Cabo Matapalo area which is about 18km south of Puerto Jimenez at the tip of the peninsula. Last March (2016), we arranged to visit Osa Conservation's biological station and during our visit,  Manuel...

Uncategorized / 30.05.2017

Blogpost written by Marina Garrido, Research Field Assistant A few days ago, part of the staff and some researchers went for a walk with Osa Conservation's botanist, Reinaldo Aguilar, from the biological station to the wildlife-friendly farm. All along the way, Reinaldo showed everyone different kinds of plants that grow in the Osa Peninsula, and shared his knowledge about the flora. We all had a lot of fun and enjoyed each plant we saw with all five senses. Since the staff is comprised of both Spanish and English speakers,...

Uncategorized / 24.05.2017

Blogpost written by Eleanor Flatt, Biodiversity Research Field Assistant   In the Osa, “biodiversity” is an  understatement… In the human world, we select people to represent our countries, our towns, our villages, our communities; it is similar in the animal kingdom. A flagship species is an ambassador for a specific habitat and normally conservation of that species or the area they inhabit has benefits for other species. Here in the Osa Peninsula, we are home to a staggering 2.5% of the planets biodiversity, living on a mere 0.00000085% of the earth's...

Uncategorized / 16.05.2017

Blogpost written by Alejandra Rojas, Naturalist Guide and Avian Program Coordinator        Photo 1:  The endemic & endangered Golfodulcean Poison-arrow Frog  and Black-cheeked Ant Tanager (Photo credit: Manuel Sanchez Mendoza)   What does a Golfodulcean Poison-arrow Frog and a Black-cheeked Ant-tanager have in common? Not only are they endemic to the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, but they are also endangered - a term used to describe when there are so few individuals surviving that the species is at risk of no longer existing in the wild.  There are many reasons that...