Volunteers and Visitors / 01.02.2015

A few months ago it was suggested to me by my wonderful DC coworkers that I go down to the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, visit our field stations, and maybe, just maybe, consider taking a permanent role on-site volunteer coordinator. At first, as usually occurs with any life-changing event, I was slightly skeptical. Sure, I had worked for Osa Conservation for over a year, supported it’s projects, and had a deep rooted fascination with being able to work “in the field,” but I had also lived most of...

Volunteers and Visitors / 17.09.2014

Written by: Florencia Franzini (for once its's actually me!) Osa Conservation’s on the ground staff is made up of about 20 individuals managing about 6,500 acres of land on a regular basis. It’s hard to believe that so few can accomplish so much, thus today as I write this blog detailing my first ever encounter with the Osa Peninsula, I’m really here attempting to highlight the hard work of the staff on-site at the organization. Let me just start by saying that it’s no wonder these guys work as hard as they...

Volunteers and Visitors / 26.08.2014

By Jatin D. My family was given the opportunity to visit Osa Conservation in Costa Rica by one of my mother’s former students. At first we didn’t really know what to expect. We flew to the Piro Biological Station from San Jose in a very small plane that made me very nervous at first; the first of our unique experiences before we even arrived at the research center. While we were driving towards the research center, we saw our first wild animal, a mammal running across the bushes adjacent to...

Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 22.07.2014

Inspiration comes in many shapes and forms - the medium from which we craft our thoughts and feelings, too, are many. On his last visit to the Osa Peninsula Neil Deupree wrote this lovely poem in his journals, and he has so graciously decided to share  it with everyone so we too can experience a bit of the inspiration the Osa Peninsula has to offer. Thank you, Neil. *** OSA PENINSULA Sitting on the front porch at Piro The surf is distant thunder  - be sure to pack the poncho. The cicadas are way more than white noise in the background. The tortuguitos...

Environmental Education, Science and Research, Uncategorized, Volunteers and Visitors / 23.06.2014

Written by: David Parreno Duque Translated by: Florencia Franzini [caption id="attachment_6262" align="alignleft" width="300"] Students receive a "creek talk" about the local Osa Ecosystem.[/caption] From June 12 to June 17 we had the pleasure of being able to work with a group of students from the La Paz Community School of Guanacaste, Costa Rica. The main on-going project that the alumni focused on was comparing water quality assessments of the Piro River and the Coyunda River – students examined and related the chemical composition of these two rivers, while also examining the different macroinvertebrates between the...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 28.03.2014

by Lauren Lipuma, Conservation Outreach Coordinator, and Jim Palmer, founder of Creek Connections This past week local students from Puerto Jiménez had the chance to discover what lives in the streams that flow by their small town and the incredible amount of chemistry and biology that goes into keeping their water sources clean and healthy. Led by veteran biologist Jim Palmer, founder of the Creek Connections program at Allegheny College, Osa Conservation staff and volunteers worked with 8 sixth-grade students, a teacher, and several parents from the local public school...

Science and Research, Sea Turtles, Volunteers and Visitors / 18.02.2014

by: Lauren Lipuma and Lindsay Metz [caption id="attachment_5799" align="aligncenter" width="627"] Volunteer Alisa Wang collects vulnerable turtle eggs from the beach for relocation to our hatchery.[/caption] The 2013 Sea Turtle Season at Osa Conservation has ended, and what a spectacular year it was! From the opening of the new turtle hatchery to the annual festival on Carate beach, it was an exciting and successful year for OC’s sea turtle conservation program. The Osa is home to four species of sea turtles: Leatherback, Hawksbill, Olive Ridley, and Pacific Green. Our beaches mainly support...

Aves, Birds, Miscellaneous, Volunteers and Visitors / 27.12.2013

It’s that time of year again - birding time! Aside from the hundreds of native tropical birds who reside in the Osa, the peninsula is also winter home for many North American migratory birds. Every spring, they return to nest - the Scarlet Tanager, the Indigo Bunting, the Golden-Winged Warbler, the Baltimore Oriole, and scores of other migrant songbirds. And every winter, they make the perilous journey back to the rainforests of Central America to wait out the long cold season. Unfortunately, their wintering grounds are under intense pressure...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education, Sea Turtles, Volunteers and Visitors / 01.11.2013

by Pilar Bernal, Environmental Education & Community Outreach Program Manager Video by Lindsay Metz http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNaCw6OrDU4&feature=youtu.be On October 6th, we celebrated our fifth annual Sea Turtle Festival on Carate beach. Over 150 gusts joined us for these festivities highlighting the past year of sea turtle conservation. The sun shone brightly throughout the event while families began pouring in as early as 8 am and stayed throughout the day. We began the festival with the release of infant sea turtles from the Corcovado Turtle Committee (COTORCO) hatchery. Afterwards, we played games and held events encouraging...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Volunteers and Visitors / 24.10.2013

by Katherine Clukey, Sustainable Agriculture Intern [caption id="attachment_5501" align="alignnone" width="600"] Yvonne Hilterman and Brigid Prouse collect trash during the morning Piro beach patrol.[/caption]   Pollution in our environment is a serious threat to the balance and flow of our natural ecosystems.  Marine habitats are especially vulnerable to pollution as oceanic currents, gyres, and winds collect and accumulate debris threatening marine life, fishing, and economies.  Being that every river leads to the sea and the ocean is downhill from everywhere, the responsibility of marine pollution comes down to us all.  Plastic, in particular,...