News + Stories

Uncategorized / 07.09.2017

Blog post written by Juan Carlos Cruz, Feline Program Coordinator Osa Conservation is excited to have worked with our partners to host the very first workshop for the Osa Camera Trap Network!   [caption id="attachment_10339" align="aligncenter" width="346"] Photo of Osa Camera Trap Network Workshop[/caption]   This Network gathers together those in the Osa interested in doing research on wildcat conservation - including partners from communities, private companies, research institutions and conservationist organizations- to help inform conservation decision-making and provide a baseline of wildcat data for generations to come. Wildcats are keystone species, which are...

Uncategorized / 29.08.2017

Blogpost written by Dr. Andrew Whitworth, Director of Restoration Ecology & Biodiversity Conservation   Last night, as I prepared my evening feed (rice with something), I heard a strange and unfamiliar squeaking sound from outside. I grabbed my head torch (aka.flashlight) and out I went. This is what I found. [caption id="attachment_10293" align="aligncenter" width="372"] Eyelash pit viper starting its meal (Photo by Andrew Whitworth)[/caption]   I couldn’t believe it. Ever since moving to live on the Osa Peninsula in February, I have been desperate to see the stunning eyelash pit viper (Bothriechis schlegelii),...

Uncategorized / 23.08.2017

Blog Post by Lesley Mould, DC Office Intern Osa Conservation’s rainforest camera traps have been capturing some very exciting footage recently! One camera recorded a particularly remarkable video of a Greater Grison. Watching clips of the camera trap footage in the D.C. office motivated me to investigate some of the more unusual species that are native to the Osa, starting with the Greater Grison. The Greater Grison is a member of the weasel family. It is native to South and Central America and inhabits forest and cerrado habitats. It is...

Uncategorized / 14.08.2017

Blogpost written by Emily Bartone, Sea Turtle Research Field Assistant Working with the sea turtle program, I feel lucky to spend my mornings patrolling Osa’s picturesque beaches looking for nesting sea turtles. However, one feature that can often distract from the beauty of these beaches is the presence of plastic waste that still finds its way to the coastline. While this pollution is unsightly, more importantly, it’s harmful to wildlife. Despite ongoing beach clean ups,  plastics can accumulate on our beaches because it washes up with the tide. What doesn’t make...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration / 08.08.2017

Blog Post written by Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Research Field Assistant Biodiversity & Conservation I love vanilla! But did you ever wonder where it comes from? From the vanilla bean. But not from a tree; it comes from an orchid, which grows up the tree as a vine. However, it is not that simple. Each flower opens for only 24 hours and must be pollinated within 8-12 hours. If pollination does not occur the flower wilts, drops from the vine, and no pods are produced. The vanilla bean’s pollen is...

Uncategorized / 02.08.2017

Blog Post by Eleanor Flatt, Biodiversity and Restoration Research Field Assistant and Dung Beetle enthusiast It is 1 o’clock in the morning, rain is breaking through the forest canopy. It is pitch black, and I am just about to wriggle out of my jungle hammock to check pitfall traps … again. This experience was not due to insanity, but for science. Specifically, my aim is to observe when distinct species of dung beetles are most active to better understand their role in the ecosystem. This task is just part...

Uncategorized / 25.07.2017

Blogpost written by Hilary Brumberg, Ríos Saludables Program Coordinator  Hello fellow nature enthusiasts! My name is Hilary Brumberg, and I am the new coordinator of the Ríos Saludables (Healthy Rivers) program. I just graduated from Wesleyan University in Connecticut a few weeks ago with a degree in environmental science and Spanish, and I am a Princeton in Latin America fellow. My day-to-day activities here in the Osa Peninsula are very different from those in urban Connecticut. Each morning, I crawl out of my bug net and emerge among the mango trees on...

Volunteers and Visitors / 19.07.2017

Blogpost written by Sawyer Judge, Volunteer Before going to the Osa for the first time, I was looking forward to seeing rare big cats, incredible crawling insects and of course the famous scarlet Macaw's that thrive in the region. But the Osa was so much more than I could have ever expected and it amazed me from the moment I got here! [caption id="attachment_10222" align="aligncenter" width="300"] Photo by CIFOR on Flickr[/caption] The taxi ride to Osa Conservation's biological station is bumpy, but with taxi-driver Andi (a man from Germany who has lived...

Birds / 11.07.2017

Blogpost written by Patrick Newcombe, Conservation Visitor  When I first arrived in the Osa for my birding experience, the tremendous diversity of birds astounded me. I seemed to spot a new species each time I walk into the forest around Osa Conservation's biological station.  Even at the station itself, I saw such birds as the Fiery-billed Aracari, an endemic species in both Panama and Costa Rica. The species diversity stems, in large part, from the selective pressure insectivorous birds put on their prey. This causes insects to adapt in order...

Uncategorized / 07.07.2017

Blogpost by Sawyer Judge "Was your coral scouting successful?" I hear a lovely British accent come calling from the stairs. Two dogs come bounding down the stairs to the beach as Harvey is helping us out of the boat. The owner of the accent, Susan, makes her way towards us. "How was the boat ride, loves? Come refresh with some juice in the kitchen. It's cas juice! Fresh made!" There are six of us visiting the Saladero EcoLodge that Harvey and Susan call home. Harvey and Susan are long-time partners of Osa Conservation, and they're housing us...