News + Stories

Uncategorized / 29.04.2016

Written by: Evan Whitfield and Tye Dubrule In February 2016, 13 undergraduate students and faculty members from the University of Alberta’s Augustana Campus in Camrose traveled from snowy Canadian winter, to the Osa Peninsula as part of a year-long tropical ecology and conservation course. This trip was the culmination of five months of preparation that included learning about neotropical biota, developing our field research proposals, and organizing trip logistics. For most of us the dream of an adventure to Costa Rica was many years in the making, and for all of...

Uncategorized / 15.04.2016

Written by: Adam Parr Black-cheeked Ant-Tanagers (Habia atrimaxillaris) may not be most glamorous bird on the Osa Peninsula.  They lack the striking colors of a Scarlet Macaw, or Fiery-billed Araçari, and are mostly dull black, with just a splash of salmon in the throat and breast.  Their vocalizations won’t send a chill down your spine like the eerie pan flute-like songs of a Common Potoo, and consist instead of a slurred two or three note whistle of a song.  However, these superficially lackluster attributes belie a truly fascinating species, and...

Uncategorized / 08.04.2016

By Ali Stahr The world has recognized that there is a new major environmental concern: the decrease of multiple bee species. This is extremely concerning because of the vital roles bees play in pollination. However, bees are not the only species suffering - there is an overall decrease in pollinators. Other such pollinators include butterflies and some species of vertebrae (hummingbirds, bats, etc). The U.N. has shed some light on the dilemma in a recently released report that analyzed 3,000 scientific papers. From the reports, they concluded that 40%...

Uncategorized / 01.04.2016

Escrito por: Patricia Perles Sin duda uno de los animales que más ilusión me ha hecho poder ver desde que estoy en la península de Osa, en Costa Rica, es este bicho raro. Desde que eres pequeño te cuentan que existen los osos hormigueros, pero nunca te imaginas verlos y no eres capaz de concebir que un animal así exista, pero ¡existen! y es genial verlos de cerca. Aunque ya se ha vuelto bastante común encontrármelos prácticamente cada madrugada, nunca me canso de verlos. Los osos hormigueros, tienen de todo...

Uncategorized / 21.03.2016

Happy International Day of Forests!! Although we didn’t really need an excuse to talk about forest conservation, the fact that today is dedicated to forests seemed like a good opportunity to remind everyone why forests are so incredibly important! Why are forests so important you ask? Well there are many reasons ranging from habitat protection to climate change. One of the most important global contributions a forest can provide, is their ability to absorb and store carbon. Trees use energy from the sun and carbon dioxide from our atmosphere to produce...

Uncategorized / 11.03.2016

Written by: Alex Rudee The stars overhead were fading into the pale blue dawn as we entered the jungle. Under the thick cover of the canopy, darkness had not yet given way to sunrise, so we relied on the beams of our headlamps to illuminate our path along the Ajo trail. I hiked behind Tabea, who manages the wildcat monitoring program in one of her many hats at Osa Conservation. Just a few minutes down the trail, Tabea stopped short, her light trained on the blanket of fallen leaves underfoot. "There," she pointed to...

Uncategorized / 19.02.2016

Escrito por: Patricia Perles Mi nombre es Patricia Perles, y llegué a Conservación Osa hace tan solo tres semanas para trabajar como asistente de campo en el programa de tortugas marinas, pero ya desde el principio me di cuenta de que este rincón de la Península de Osa, tiene mucho más que ofrecer. Tras un paseo por los senderos con Agustín, te das cuenta de que el bosque es mucho más, más que aire puro, agua fresca, refugio, alimento...

Uncategorized / 19.02.2016

Written by : Emily Deanne Walking into Osa Conservation's DC Office on a sunny day in August I did not realize I was embarking on a new chapter of my life. I was certainly excited to see what the office would look like. I sincerely wondered if the goals of the organization would be reflected in the office's atmosphere. I was not disappointed as I entered a warm and cozy floor filled with bright colors and images of the rainforest and its breathtaking wildlife. My personal favorite would have to be either the picture...

Uncategorized / 12.02.2016

By Jane Hamilton: When I left the Osa Peninsula in the summer of 2014, I thought I might never return. The trip had been a life changing experience for me and the peninsula was the most wonderful and exciting place I had ever been. Unfortunately, it is not the easiest place to get to from Scotland. I assumed life would lead me down other paths. Last June I graduated from university with a degree in zoology and little idea of what to do next. All I had was a vague notion that I wanted...

Uncategorized / 05.02.2016

By Beatriz Lopez Last week, here at Piro Biological Station, we celebrated the Carbon Sequestration and Restoration in the Lowland Tropical Forests Workshop organized by Osa Conservation and sponsored by the Bobolink Foundation. All of the sudden, Piro Station was buzzing with local and international scientist and researchers from whom participants, volunteers, and members of the staff, like me, had the privilege to learn, to exchange ideas, and also to connect and foster future collaborations. The workshop brought together leaders in Carbon and Restoration Research, for example: Dr. Thomas E. Lovely whose contribution to Environmental Policy...