News + Stories

Uncategorized / 10.06.2016

A little over one year ago conservation lost one of its finest and both the Osa and Corcovado National Park lost their greatest champion. The founding of Corcovado National Park, the so-called jewel of the Osa, and other national parks was spearheaded by a few tenacious conservationists and visionaries, among them Alvaro Ugalde Viquiz. The contribution Alvaro Ugalde made to conservation extends far beyond this one park and the Osa – but he made no secret of the fact that Corcovado was his favorite park and the Osa was...

Uncategorized / 03.06.2016

The banana is one of the most popular fruits in the world. However, since each banana is genetically identical it is highly susceptible to disease. The Osa Verde Farm is able to combat such disease by planting genetically diverse bananas, not using chemical inputs, and maintaining other sustainable practices. By: Holland Cathey The banana. A fruit that we have grown to love, rely on, and ultimately take for granted may be in danger of going extinct.  A seemingly incurable fungus called the Panama Disease is rapidly spreading to plantations around the world...

Uncategorized / 27.05.2016

La Nación: http://www.nacion.com/vivir/ambiente/Ticos-agua-persona_0_1550044983.html “Ticos tendrán 65% menos agua por persona para el año 2020” 22 de marzo de 2016, Michelle Soto M.   Ríos Saludables de Osa trabajando para conservar la calidad del agua en la Península de Osa [caption id="attachment_9067" align="alignleft" width="300"] Figura 1. Miembros de Ríos Saludables de Osa participando en un taller en la Estación Biológica Piro de Conservación Osa, Diciembre 2015.[/caption] Este marzo 2016,  La Nación publicó un importante artículo sobre la cantidad y calidad del agua en Costa Rica, tema crítico en el trabajo del proyecto de Ríos Saludables...

Uncategorized / 27.05.2016

The Nation: http://www.nacion.com/vivir/ambiente/Ticos-agua-persona_0_1550044983.html “Costa Ricans will have 65% less water per person by the year 2020” March 22, 2016, Michelle Soto M.   Osa’s Healthy Rivers has been working to conserve the water quality in the Osa Peninsula. [caption id="attachment_9068" align="alignleft" width="300"] Figure 1. Group from The Gamba School monitoring The Gamba River, close to the Golf, May 2016.[/caption] This march in 2016, The Nation published an important article about the quantity and quality of water in Costa Rica, the critical theme in the work of Osa’s healthy river project, which monitors...

Uncategorized / 12.05.2016

The lush and enchanted forests of Piro, Osa Conservation saw the return of their majestic King of the Jungle after two long years. The Jaguar Is Back! In the late hours of 23rd March 2016 the first images of this beautiful creature was captured on the camera traps on the Ajo trail. Since the last sightings of the jaguar on the camera traps here was back in 2014, his return is very exciting. Especially for the big cat programme and its researcher Tabea who ran out screaming “JAGUAR JAGUAR” when...

Uncategorized / 06.05.2016

Bokashi: Improving the Soil through Solid Waste By Yngrid Espinoza In a time of unparalleled consumption, intensive agricultural production, mass exploitation of raw materials and countless other activities that advance 'development' - we in Costa Rica are generating an enormous quantity of solid waste daily. According to the University of Costa Rica, each individual produces a staggering 1.3 - 2.4 pounds of waste daily. 45% of this ends up in illegal dumps and approximately 50-60% of this waste is biodegradable material. With this in mind, the vision of Osa Conservation's Sustainable Agriculture Program is utilize organic waste to generate organic fertilizer for our farm. It is essential...

Uncategorized / 06.05.2016

Por Yngrid Espinoza En una etapa tan consumista y con altos movimientos de producción de carne o cultivos, procesamientos de materia prima y el sinfín de actividades que desarrolla el ser humano está generando una enorme cantidad de residuos sólidos diarios. Según la UCR, se produce de 0.6 a 1.1 kilos per cápita de basura diaria, 45% terminan en botaderos clandestinos y la cobertura de recolección es de alrededor de un 75%; sobre todo que un 50-60% son materiales biodegradables que podrían ser reciclados. En nuestro primer mes...

Uncategorized / 29.04.2016

Written by: Evan Whitfield and Tye Dubrule In February 2016, 13 undergraduate students and faculty members from the University of Alberta’s Augustana Campus in Camrose traveled from snowy Canadian winter, to the Osa Peninsula as part of a year-long tropical ecology and conservation course. This trip was the culmination of five months of preparation that included learning about neotropical biota, developing our field research proposals, and organizing trip logistics. For most of us the dream of an adventure to Costa Rica was many years in the making, and for all of...

Uncategorized / 15.04.2016

Written by: Adam Parr Black-cheeked Ant-Tanagers (Habia atrimaxillaris) may not be most glamorous bird on the Osa Peninsula.  They lack the striking colors of a Scarlet Macaw, or Fiery-billed Araçari, and are mostly dull black, with just a splash of salmon in the throat and breast.  Their vocalizations won’t send a chill down your spine like the eerie pan flute-like songs of a Common Potoo, and consist instead of a slurred two or three note whistle of a song.  However, these superficially lackluster attributes belie a truly fascinating species, and...

Uncategorized / 08.04.2016

By Ali Stahr The world has recognized that there is a new major environmental concern: the decrease of multiple bee species. This is extremely concerning because of the vital roles bees play in pollination. However, bees are not the only species suffering - there is an overall decrease in pollinators. Other such pollinators include butterflies and some species of vertebrae (hummingbirds, bats, etc). The U.N. has shed some light on the dilemma in a recently released report that analyzed 3,000 scientific papers. From the reports, they concluded that 40%...