News + Stories

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research / 14.11.2018

Blog Post by Elène Haave Audet, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant   [caption id="attachment_11964" align="aligncenter" width="448"] Elène holding a Noctilio leporinus, the Greater bulldog bat, which fishes from streams. Photo: Doris Audet[/caption] For many of us, the creatures of the tropical forest that dare venture at night remain elusive and mysterious beings, their ways of life foreign to us daytime dwellers. Among these enigmatic animals are bats, the group of mammals with the second largest number of species in the world, whose charismatic presence in the tropics will not go...

Uncategorized / 07.11.2018

Blog Post by Marco Hidalgo, Coordinator for Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse Our tropical forests, including the extensions of mangroves that slope down the south pacific, suffer a constant threat from different man-made factors. One of the most significant threats is the lack of predators and their prey, which have decreased due to recreational and cultural hunting in the Osa Peninsula. In the search for practical solutions on the ecosystem-level, Osa Conservation’s Prevention of Ecosystem Collapse project hopes to increase the resilience of ecosystems in the Osa Peninsula through the use...

Uncategorized / 07.11.2018

Blog Post por Marco Hidalgo, Coordinador del Prevención Colapso de los Ecosistemas Los bosques tropicales, incluyendo las extensiones de manglares en la vertiente del pacífico sur, sufren una constante amenaza por diferentes factores antropogénicos. Una de las amenazas más significativas es la pérdida de depredadores y sus presas, las cuales han disminuido debido a la cacería recreativa y cultural en la Península de Osa. En la búsqueda de soluciones prácticas al nivel ecosistémico, Conservación Osa, a través de su proyecto de “Prevención del colapso de los ecosistemas”, pretende aumentar la...

Uncategorized / 31.10.2018

Blog Post by José Luis Molina Quirós, Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship Awardee Costa Rica has a great diversity of species and marine ecosystems that protect and provide food to hundreds of organisms in various phases of their life cycle. For example, El Golfo de Papagayo and Golfo Dulce are just a few of the many hot spots that harbor this diversity of marine species and ecosystems, but these species have not been completely protected. [caption id="attachment_11784" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Sampling of species (Lutjanus guttatus, L. peru and Centropumus viridis) product of artisanal fisheries.[/caption] Currently, our country...

Uncategorized / 24.10.2018

Blogposts written by Research Field Assistants Mariam Weyand, Bryan Graybill, and Alexandra Mörth Rewarding Research Working as a research field assistant (RFA) for the Sea Turtle Conservation Program with Osa Conservation is really different from the other places I have worked for, and so far, it has been really rewarding. Every day, we conduct morning patrols to register any activity from the previous night and relocate nests that are at risk to the hatchery. I wake up between 3:45 and 5:00 a.m. depending on which beach I am going to patrol and on the...

Uncategorized / 16.10.2018

Blog Post by Breanna Hart Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” Osa Conservation has allowed me to both live and learn in a beautiful environment that no other place in the world can contest with. The spectacular view of the ocean and rainforest back-to-back lead me to a tropical wilderness and the fascinating creatures within it. One magnificent creature that spends time on the unique beaches is the turtle, and this is my experience with them: 4.30...

Uncategorized / 08.10.2018

Blog Post by James Purcell, Restoration and Rewilding Intern The daylight was rapidly disappearing, as we clambered through the thick undergrowth, over vines and palm leaves bigger than me, then across a muddy stream and still more dense brush. Then, we heard it again -  a long, mournful series of calls that sounded like a child laughing, or perhaps crying, in the distance. We all stopped, holding our breath; the only sounds were the omnipresent croaking of the frogs and the pumping of our excited hearts. Then, as casually as...

Uncategorized / 02.10.2018

Blog Post by Stanimira Deleva, Alvaro Ugalde Scholarship Awardee The Osa Peninsula is a place where, even after hundreds of exploratory expeditions, there is always something to be discovered. As one of the world's most biodiverse sites, the Osa is home to a vast variety of bats, most who use caves as a refuge, that have not yet been fully explored. I first visited the peninsula in 2015 to study the bats. Several of the bats that we caught in mist nets were cave-dwellers. I wondered where these bats...

Uncategorized / 26.09.2018

Blog Post By Marina Garrido, Restoration & Rewilding Program Assistant As one of the assistants of the Restoration & Rewilding Program, I am happy to announce a new project entitled “Creating the First Conservation Action Plan for the Endemic and Endangered Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog using Citizen Science and Tiny-Tech.” [caption id="attachment_11740" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Phyllobates vittatus posing perfectly for Robin Moore´s camera lens at Osa Conservation's Biological Station. Photo taken from the book In Search of Lost Frogs by Robin Moore.[/caption] Many of you might be wondering, what makes...

Uncategorized / 17.09.2018

Blog Post by Avery Kaplan, Rios Saludables Intern One sunny day this summer, the Ríos Saludables team was wading through the rivers Agujas, La Palma, Montarey, and Sabalo, collecting shrimp traps number 122 through number 132. It was the third time in three months that we had set and collected traps all along these rivers, and we were back the second time that week to check on the traps that we had set the day before. In other words, sometimes even the best field work gets repetitive. [caption id="attachment_11848" align="aligncenter"...