News + Stories

Uncategorized / 22.05.2018

Blogpost written by Luis Carlos Solis, Technical Assistant The mangrove fern, an opportunist in disturbed environments Mangroves are one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world. Unfortunately, mangroves in Costa Rica are no exception -  every day, mangroves around the country are devastated due to human activity, despite being declared protected areas . There are more than 80 protected mangroves identified in Costa Rica, representing approximately 41,002 hectares (101 318 acres), of which 99% are located in the Pacific. Just north of the Osa,  Térraba Sierpe National Wetland stands...

Uncategorized / 11.05.2018

Blog de Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Coordinadora de los proyectos botánicos Uno de los objetivos de Conservación Osa es apoyar la conservación de árboles amenazados a través del programa de conservación ex situ (la creación de un jardín botánico) que complementa la conservación in situ a través del programa de restauración ecológica y resilvestracion. Sobre el cornizuelo Hace más de un año que sembramos semillas de un árbol Vachellia allenii, localmente llamado cornizuelo (árbol de los cuernos). Este árbol se le encuentra creciendo tanto en los bosques primarios y secundarios y puede alcanzar a...

Uncategorized / 11.05.2018

Blog by Ruthmery Pillco Huarcaya, Botanical Projects Coordinator (Translated by Amaris Norwood, DC office intern)   One of Osa Conservation’s objectives is to support the conservation of at-risk trees through the conservation ex-situ program  (such as the creation of a botanical garden) which is a supplement of the in-situ ecological restoration and rewilding program that we continue to pursue. About the Cornizuelo It has been more than a year since we planted the seeds of a Vachellia allenii tree, locally known as a cornizuelo (the tree of the horns).  This tree can be found growing...

Uncategorized / 09.05.2018

Blog Post by Marina Garrido, Restoration Research Field Assistant [caption id="attachment_11289" align="alignnone" width="752"] Growing Trees in the Osa's Forest Floor. Photo by Frank Uhlig[/caption] Recent Restoration Success at Osa Conservation Over the past months, the Osa Verde Restoration Plots have been the liveliest place on our property. Wondering why? During this time, we have worked and successfully planted 14,000 trees! A large hard-working team is behind this incredible project. But one of the main pillars of our restoration success is Agustin Mendoza.   [caption id="attachment_11288" align="alignnone" width="752"] Saplings in our Tree Nursery. Photo by Frank Uhlig[/caption] Agustin...

Uncategorized / 02.05.2018

Blog Post by Lawrence Whittaker, Osa Conservation Field Researcher [caption id="attachment_11274" align="aligncenter" width="513"] A Spider Monkey Observing the Osa Canopy; Photo by Manuel Sanchez[/caption] Elusive Subjects of Study The Osa Peninsula is a stronghold for the Central American spider monkey, an arboreal acrobat adapt to navigating the rainforest canopy. Studying these dynamic mammals can be a challenge, as they don’t give up their secrets easily. To study spider monkeys, one must track them from the moment they wake to the moment they fall asleep. With the closed canopy that blocks out fading daylight from those on the...

Uncategorized / 25.04.2018

Blog Post by Hilary Brumberg, Rios Saludables Program Coordinator [caption id="attachment_11262" align="aligncenter" width="576"] Osa Land Cover Maps from 1987 to 2017.[/caption]   Good news for Osa’s forests and wildlife! Over the past 30 years, the Osa has seen an 11% increase in vegetation and a decrease in grassland. This year, Osa Conservation started an exciting new partnership with NASA DEVELOP and the University of Georgia (UGA). NASA DEVELOP partners with local organizations to apply NASA Earth observations to address environmental issues around the globe. Through this partnership, we gained insight regarding land use and...

Uncategorized / 18.04.2018

Blog Post by Amaris Norwood, Intern in our DC Office [caption id="attachment_11228" align="aligncenter" width="909"] A Couple of Purple Passion Flowers; Photo by Manuel Sanchez[/caption] It's Almost Earth Day! As Earth Day approaches, we can take this time to reflect on the current environmental state of the planet.  From habitat loss to climate change, from poaching to illegal animal trade. Over recent years, we have seen species decline.  At the same time, we’ve seen habitats and species regenerate. Marine restoration, reforestation, and other conservation and preservation efforts are to thank for this.  At times, we've even been...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2018

Blog Post by Yoshinari Fukuzawa from Middlebury College [caption id="attachment_11219" align="aligncenter" width="909"] Sunny Day on the Beach at Osa; Photo by Frank Uhlig[/caption] Journal 1: The sea turtle eggs were so soft, so delicate.  While we knelt on the warm sand and reached deep into the hole we dug, our hands gently searched for the surface of the eggs.  Once found, we took each out, one by one, clasping the soft shells that individually held a life inside.  Although frightened we might break an egg, we felt thrilled once our fingers came upon the smooth surfaces.  “Mother’s touch,” one of...

Uncategorized / 04.04.2018

Blog Post by Sarah Karerat from Middlebury College [caption id="attachment_11207" align="aligncenter" width="940"] The beach during sunset at Osa; Photo by Manuel Sanchez[/caption] While spending our first night in our cabina at Osa, I awoke in the middle of the night to the noises that surrounded us.  The howler monkeys were screeching, rain was pouring, and I could hear insects and the Pacific Ocean crashing against the coast. I remember thinking that I may as well be sleeping outside.  During my stay, I truly felt like there was no barrier between me and...

Uncategorized / 28.03.2018

Blogpost written by Sydney Denham, Conservation Volunteer [caption id="attachment_11180" align="aligncenter" width="632"] Underneath Osa's Canopy. Photo by Manuel Sánchez[/caption] As a Conservation Volunteer at Osa Conservation, I get the best of every world. I am taking a year off after graduating high school to explore my many interests in an attempt to better understand some of the subjects I am considering studying in college, one of which is biology. What better place to fully experience the life of a field biologist than at a research station in one of the most biologically intense...