News + Stories

Uncategorized / 06.06.2017

Blogpost written by Robert Baker, Volunteer Hi, my name is Bob Baker. For the past 10 years, my wife Lindsay and I have come to the Osa Peninsula for two weeks every March. We come to enjoy what National Geographic calls the “most biologically intense place on earth.” We typically stay in vacation rentals in the Cabo Matapalo area which is about 18km south of Puerto Jimenez at the tip of the peninsula. Last March (2016), we arranged to visit Osa Conservation's biological station and during our visit,  Manuel...

Aquatic Health, Marine Conservation / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez The world’s seafood stocks will have completely collapsed by the year 2050, scientists say.  According to a study done by a group of economists and ecologists, the growth of the human population combined with unsustainable fishing practices and the devastating loss of biodiversity will lead to the collapse of fish populations in the next 35 years, if trends continue on their current path. [caption id="attachment_9221" align="alignleft" width="199"] Image from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/[/caption] If the idea of losing all of the world’s fish scares you as much as it scares me,...

Volunteers and Visitors / 11.09.2015

Cesar Barrio-Amoros holds a PhD in biology and is a notable taxonomist, herpetologist, author, and photographer. Following his experience in the Osa, reflected below, Cesar has planned to lead a reptile and amphibian workshop at Piro Biological Station next May or June, the beginning of the wet season. I have traveled throughout most of Latin America in search of amazing herping spectacles. In the Galapagos, I saw marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and Galapagos giant tortoises (Chelonoidis nigra). I witnessed an astonishing diversity of poison frogs in Peru and made some...

Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 07.08.2015

Submitted by Steven Waldron; Seattle, WA Twenty years ago, I backpacked and hiked along the wild beaches and coastal rainforests of the Osa peninsula and became acquainted with some of the fantastic wildlife that the region is well-known for. Near the Sirena station at Corcovado National Park, I became intimate with the loud squawks of Scarlet Macaws sailing overhead, the crash of surprised tapirs bolting through the forest, and the pre-dawn chorus of Howler monkeys. One of the sensory aspects I appreciate most about exploring this region is the...

Environmental Education, Science and Research, Volunteers and Visitors / 14.07.2015

The Magnificent Gleaning Phyllostomines of the Osa Submitted by : Doris Audet and Elène Haave Audet, University of Alberta, Canada Among the rich bat fauna to call Osa Conservation home, a select group speaks to the pristine nature of its old-growth forest: the gleaning phyllostomines.  These large-eared members of the highly diverse leaf-nosed bat family favour habitats of high ecological integrity that include mature forests and undisturbed riparian corridors. [caption id="attachment_8035" align="alignleft" width="300"] They kindly allowed us to take their photos before going on with their lives.[/caption] Phyllostomines are typically found in low abundance...

Community Outreach, Environmental Education / 06.05.2011

[caption id="attachment_2011" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Parade for International Year of Forests Celebration"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_2024" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Stencil painting activity with ASCONA for International Year of Forests"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_2016" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Puerto Jimenez students performing a traditional dance for International Year of Forests celebration"][/caption] Check out these exciting programs and events happening in Osa! INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF FORESTS In celebration of the United Nations International Year of Forests, FOO’s environmental education program began tropical rainforest workshops in April with students and teachers from 13 Osa schools. There was an exciting opening event on Saturday April...

Birds, Volunteers and Visitors / 19.04.2011

[caption id="attachment_1988" align="alignleft" width="225" caption="International Migratory Bird Day 2011"][/caption] Just to set the scene… the following is a bit of what I wrote to you last October 2010 in recognition of a well known day that pays homage to migratory birds all throughout the Americas. “Have you ever sat and marveled at the wonder of bird migration; the journey that birds undertake between their winter and summer homes?  Well if so, you’re not alone, and it is a cause for celebration!  Each year hundreds of thousands of people gather to...

Birds, Volunteers and Visitors / 23.12.2010

[caption id="attachment_1870" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Red-lored Parrots"][/caption] This year Friends of the Osa organized the first annual Costa Rica Osa Peninsula Christmas Bird Count, a more than century long Audubon Society tradition.  This year actually marks the 111th Audubon CBC and on December 17th 2010 Friends of the Osa along with Osa Peninsula lodges, the Osa Peninsula Birders Association, Osa bird experts and enthusiasts headed out at dawn and dusk to count as many birds that could be seen, heard or flushed out from under foot. All throughout the Americas citizen...

Science and Research, Sea Turtles / 30.11.2010

Today SEE Turtles launched its effort to raise money for Friends of the Osa’s annual Sea Turtle Festival.  SEE Turtles is a project of the Ocean Foundation that promotes conservation tourism by acting as a resource for travelers to connect with volunteer programs or to donate to organizations protecting sea turtles and educating communities.  Through the matching fund launched today, you can donate to support FOO’s Sea Turtle Festival in 2011. [caption id="attachment_1857" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Children perform the life cycle of sea turtles at the Second Annual Osa Sea Turtle...

Birds / 26.11.2010

[caption id="attachment_1840" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Male White-crested Coquette"][/caption] Of all the hummingbird species, the coquette males that are most highly adorned with ornate feathers that are there to likely help in territorial defense and enhance species recognition.  The White-crested Coquette (Lophornis adorabilis) is the only coquette found here on the Osa Peninsula and is regionally endemic to south western Costa Rica and Western Panama. The male of this species, which is also sometimes called Adorable Coquette, is known for its white crest and long green cheek tufts and may be arguably...