News + Stories

Uncategorized / 06.06.2017

Blogpost written by Robert Baker, Volunteer Hi, my name is Bob Baker. For the past 10 years, my wife Lindsay and I have come to the Osa Peninsula for two weeks every March. We come to enjoy what National Geographic calls the “most biologically intense place on earth.” We typically stay in vacation rentals in the Cabo Matapalo area which is about 18km south of Puerto Jimenez at the tip of the peninsula. Last March (2016), we arranged to visit Osa Conservation's biological station and during our visit,  Manuel...

Aquatic Health, Marine Conservation / 12.08.2016

By: Clara Gomez The world’s seafood stocks will have completely collapsed by the year 2050, scientists say.  According to a study done by a group of economists and ecologists, the growth of the human population combined with unsustainable fishing practices and the devastating loss of biodiversity will lead to the collapse of fish populations in the next 35 years, if trends continue on their current path. [caption id="attachment_9221" align="alignleft" width="199"] Image from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/[/caption] If the idea of losing all of the world’s fish scares you as much as it scares me,...

Science and Research / 04.01.2013

As some of you may know from following our Facebook and Twitter posts, Manuel Sanchez Mendoza, our Research Assistant and Sea Turtle Conservation Program Field Coordinator, has one heck of a talented eye for photographing wildlife. As an Osa native, born and raised in the peninsula, Manuel has always been fascinated with wildlife, and although he has no formal training in photography, we like to think he has a natural-born knack for it. The past few weeks in particular have been very successful for Manuel and his camera, and we at Osa Conservation are excited to share his sightings with you! All of these photos were taken at or around our Piro Biological Center. [caption id="attachment_4779" align="aligncenter" width="640"] White-faced capuchin monkey (Cebus capucinus)[/caption] [caption id="attachment_4780" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Great Curassow (Crax rubra)[/caption]
Community Outreach, Marine Conservation / 26.09.2012

[caption id="attachment_4426" align="alignleft" width="300"] Luis Daniel Montero is a kayak tour guide and a local activist[/caption] Luis Daniel Montero is a 22-year-old kayak tour guide and volunteer for ASCONA (Asociacion De Servicio Comunitario Nacional y Ambiental), a local non-governmental organization dedicated to community service and environmental conservation on the Osa Peninsula. Along with a few other ASCONA volunteers, Daniel, as he prefers to be called, is part of an extremely passionate group of activists protesting an American business-owner's proposal for a large marina development project on the Gulfo Dulce, a proposal met with considerable opposition among Osa residents and various conservationists on and around the peninsula.
Marine Conservation, Science and Research / 19.06.2012

[caption id="attachment_3816" align="alignleft" width="315" caption="A video still of a Pseudorca, or false killer whale, in Golfo Dulce"][/caption] Brooke Bessesen conducted Marine research at the Osa in 2010 and 2011 as a recipient of the Greg Gund Memorial Fellowship. Check out her Golfo Dulce report on our website. Jorge and I were always thrilled to see dolphins, as they are icons of the sea. Luckily, sightings were relatively common (only sea turtles were seen more frequently) and these graceful cetaceans graced our bow almost every day we were on the water....

Miscellaneous / 18.05.2010

[caption id="attachment_798" align="alignleft" width="300"] Recording a Stream Soundscape: Jeff Woodman, Luis Vargas & Leo Garrigues[/caption] By Karen Leavelle & Jeff Woodman The Osa Peninsula is known for its high level of biodiversity and is one of the most “biologically intense” places on earth according to National Geographic. The Osa has over half of all species found in Costa Rica. This is evident in the over 400 bird species found here. That’s quite a few birds for such a small area. Well, its time then to make them heard; to record...

Birds / 06.04.2010

The largest and possibly the most raucous of the five toucan species found in Costa Rica the Chestnut-mandibled Toucan is a common inhabitant of the Osa Peninsula.  Its characteristic calls and large yellow and chestnut colored bill are unique to this bird and is only one of two toucan species found on the peninsula.   You can usually find them in forested and semi-open areas and trees in clearings feeding mainly on fruit and an occasional insect, lizard, snake or bird nestling.  Toucans will commonly feed their mate. It...