Uncategorized / 08.01.2020

Reflections by field course students. Compiled by Hilary Brumberg, field course manager. We recently kicked off our second annual Tropical Ecology & Conservation Leadership Field Course at Osa Conservation. During this 8 week intensive field course, we provide hands-on experience and training for the next generation of conservation leaders. The course brings together an impressive international group of young scientist from Costa Rica and abroad to experience our living laboratory, the Osa Verde BioStation, and to learn real-life skills for successful careers in conservation and research in a hands-on...

Uncategorized / 26.12.2019

Blog by: María José Mata Quirós, Restoration and Rewilding Field Staff Ecological restoration is a relatively recent issue, which came to change the way we think about returning ecosystems altered by humans to the way we know as original or natural. It consists of taking a step beyond reforestation; it is about making a true evaluation of the characteristics to be established, and carry out finely planned projects. It is important to make sure that native species’ forests are generated, and to manage the efforts so that the pre-existing...

Uncategorized / 11.04.2019

Blogpost by Marco Hidalgo-Chaverri, Coordinator of the Ecosystem Resilience and Community Outreach Program Citizen science is the participation of the general public in scientific research activities. Citizens contribute actively, either through active monitoring or with local knowledge of their environment. This different way of doing science contributes to scientific knowledge through the participation of volunteer and trained citizens who are not usually specialists in the subject to be investigated and who contribute to help solve questions raised in scientific studies. Community Biological Monitoring Group of Rancho Quemado, training with the...

Uncategorized / 06.03.2019

Blotpost by Sophie Blow, General Volunteer I came to Osa Conservation as a volunteer as part of my year abroad from university to improve my Spanish. I study French, Spanish and Portuguese at Warwick University in the UK and I couldn’t think of anywhere better to immerse myself in a different culture and way of life, while improving my Spanish at the same time, than the beautiful Osa Peninsula. During my spare time as a volunteer, I try to explore the site as much as I can, to discover...

Uncategorized / 26.02.2019

Blog post by Hilary Brumberg, Healthy Rivers Program Coordinator Osa Conservation was recently awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve the research facilities, communication and equipment at our Osa Verde Biological Station (Piro), which will position this field station to become a leading center for tropical research, education and conservation. With this new infrastructure, we will increase our capacity to host interdisciplinary researchers, academic groups, and citizen science trainings, therefore advancing scientific knowledge about tropical ecology and enhancing scientific literacy.  Location of new NSF-funded laboratory at Osa...

Uncategorized / 13.02.2019

Blogpost by Mariam Weyand, Sea Turtle Biologist Osa Conservation relies on the help and support of volunteers to maximize our conservation impact, like many non-profits. Fortunately, we have diverse people coming to discover, help and get involved in our programs. We can separate them into two important groups: short term participants, such as students, families and tourists, and long-term volunteers. In 2018, we had the luck that many individuals came and helped us with field work in the Sea Turtle Program. They all came to discover the great experience and hard work...

Uncategorized / 17.01.2019

Blog por Marco Hidalgo, coordinador del programa de resiliencia del ecosistema y alcance comunitario La cacería de animales silvestres, en el caso de la Península de Osa, tiene claras características para ser considerada como un elemento cultural de las personas que la practican. Estas características se cumplen mayormente con quienes practican el monteo y con quienes cazan exclusivamente para consumir la carne. La gran mayoría de estos casos ya no se considera una práctica, sino una costumbre o tradición. Pero esta valoración de elemento cultural no es válido para...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Uncategorized / 19.12.2018

Blogpost by Elene Haave Audet, Restoration & Rewilding Research Field Assistant This October, I ventured out of the sanctity of the jungle to present at the 48thNorth American Symposium on Bat Research (NASBR) in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Over 300 researchers from across the globe gathered to share bat stories, communicate their research, and further our understanding of this hugely diverse mammalian group. Because of its location, the conference offered many opportunities to discuss the conservation of bats in the tropics, presenting a great opportunity to share Osa Conservation’s work...

Land Conservation and Forest Restoration, Science and Research, Uncategorized / 05.12.2018

Blogpost by Alice Connell, Restoration and Rewilding Research Field Assistant [caption id="attachment_12037" align="aligncenter" width="421"] Alice monitoring the effectiveness of log piles in attracting amphibian and reptile species to the restoration and rewilding plots. Photo: Sophie Blow[/caption] My work is never the same from one day to the next on the Restoration and Rewilding Program, which encompasses many diverse projects that require frequent monitoring. There is plenty to do, I always arrive at lunch hungry and satisfied after mornings of hard work. I want to give you an insight into my...